Oldest Allies, Guarded Friends: The United States and France since 1940

By Charles G. Cogan | Go to book overview
which came to realization with the explosion at Reggane in 1960 (intended partly as a nuclear case).
The "year of Europe" in 1973 when, after the launching of détente between the Soviet Union and the United States, the latter sought to define its relationship with Europe (case on the relations between the United States and Europe).
The Euro-Corps, or Franco-German Corps, a dispute that began to unfold in 1990-92, revolving around the question of the independence of Europe's defense (post-Cold War case).

A final chapter delineates some of the lessons learned from these case studies, as well as some ways to approach the future.

Let me add a word about translation. Where French-language works have been translated into English, I have in virtually all cases used that translation. Otherwise, the translations are mine. In case of doubt, I have specified myself as the translator. The matter of Jean Lacouture's biography of Charles de Gaulle is somewhat special: His three-volume work was rendered into a two-volume work in English. Much of the second volume was either left out or truncated; accordingly, I have drawn from his French-language version of this volume, providing my own translation. For the rest of his work I have used the published translation. In addition, I have at times quoted from the French-language version of de Gaulle's war memoirs rather than the English translation when I used the appended documents, which are not included in the English text.

This book is adapted from a doctoral dissertation presented to the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 1992. I would like to thank in particular my thesis advisers, Professors Ernest May and Stanley Hoffmann, for their unfailing support and guidance, as well as Professor Samuel P. Huntington, director of the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard, where I have been conducting research and writing since 1991. Specifically, I wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Tracy B. Kittredge Foundation and the Olin Institute. Finally, in addition to the persons who graciously consented to be interviewed (including several officials knowledgeable on the Euro-Corps) and the exemplary archivists at the U.S. presidential libraries, I would like to thank my wife and my brother for their constant encouragement and support.


NOTE
1.
Stanley Hoffmann, "The Man Who Would Be France," review of Jean Lacouture, De Gaulle, vol. 1, The Rebel 1890-1944, trans. Patrick O'Brian ( London: Collins Harvill, 1990), in The New Republic, December 17, 1990, 36.

-xii-

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Oldest Allies, Guarded Friends: The United States and France since 1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Note xii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - The Falling Out 19
  • Notes 49
  • 3 - The Turning Point 55
  • Notes 71
  • 4 - La Grande Nation, La Grande Armée1 75
  • Notes 95
  • 5 - The Reversal 99
  • Notes 117
  • 6 - The Multilateral Force: The Two Hegemons 121
  • Notes 146
  • 7 - Posthumous Coronation and Détente: The Year of Europe 151
  • Notes 172
  • 8 - Euro-Corps: Return of the Ambivalences 177
  • Notes 195
  • 9 - Epilogue: by Default of Enemies? 199
  • Notes 215
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 227
  • About the Author 235
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