Oldest Allies, Guarded Friends: The United States and France since 1940

By Charles G. Cogan | Go to book overview

nuclear matters between France and the United States, an area that for a long time had been a subject of discord between the two countries.

In the internal French ("franco-français") context it should be recalled that, because of the premature death of Georges Pompidou and the departure of Michel Jobert from the political scene, the Year of Europe marked the end of traditional Gaullism in France. It was in the Gaullist movement that the resentment originating from the policies of the Roosevelt administration toward the Free French movement during World War II was centered. One can say that the Year of Europe represented the last spasm of the Gaullist movement in its traditional form, as the continuity of Gaullist rule was broken with the death of Pompidou.

All this is not to say that the misunderstandings have ended between France and the United States; far from it. Differences persist in many areas, sometimes increasing in intensity, such as in the commercial area, particularly over the issue of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) of the EEC. And defense has returned to the scene as a burning issue with the breakup of the Soviet Empire and with the potentially competing roles that have resulted between NATO and the Western European Union (a subject to be dealt with in the next chapter). But all the same a certain step had been accomplished with the new Declaration of Atlantic Relations, followed by the institution of the G7 Summit and finance ministers meetings. The post-Gaullist era had begun.


NOTES
1.
Interview with the author, November 7, 1991.
2.
Maurice Vaïsse, Les relations internationales depuis 1945 ( Paris: Armand Colin, 1990), 106.
3.
Henry A. Kissinger, The Troubled Partnership ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1965), 42.
4.
Interview with the author, January 17, 1991.
5.
Interview with the author.
6.
François Flohic, Souvenirs d'Outre-Gaulle ( Paris: Plon, 1979), 103-104.
7.
Henry A. Kissinger, Years of Upheaval ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1982), 129.
8.
Michel Jobert, Mémoires d'avenir ( Paris: Grasset, 1974), 178.
9.
Kissinger, Years of Upheaval, 180.
10.
Ibid., 129.
11.
Ibid.
12.
Ibid.
13.
Interview with the author.
14.
Interview with the author.
15.
Interview with the author.
16.
Interview with the author.
17.
See p. 153.
18.
Jobert, Mémoires d'avenir, 190.
19.
Ibid., 189.

-172-

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Oldest Allies, Guarded Friends: The United States and France since 1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Note xii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - The Falling Out 19
  • Notes 49
  • 3 - The Turning Point 55
  • Notes 71
  • 4 - La Grande Nation, La Grande Armée1 75
  • Notes 95
  • 5 - The Reversal 99
  • Notes 117
  • 6 - The Multilateral Force: The Two Hegemons 121
  • Notes 146
  • 7 - Posthumous Coronation and Détente: The Year of Europe 151
  • Notes 172
  • 8 - Euro-Corps: Return of the Ambivalences 177
  • Notes 195
  • 9 - Epilogue: by Default of Enemies? 199
  • Notes 215
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 227
  • About the Author 235
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