Not by Schools Alone: Sharing Responsibility for America's Education Reform

By Sandra A. Waddock | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
Not Alone: Outside in Thinking

Schools need not be alone in accomplishing their educational mission, despite the fact that our traditional linear view places them in that position. Changing our conception of the schools, however, requires a fundamental shift in the paradigm or model through which we view schools and their activities, as well as a shift in the dynamics of the relevant systems. As has been suggested in earlier chapters, this new paradigm involves a wholly different set of assumptions about schools than are traditional.

The first new assumption is that schools are not alone responsible for education: education is fundamentally a responsibility that is shared among the important institutions that constitute society. These institutions include the families and communities, businesses and other employers, governmental agencies, educational organizations including governance bodies for schools, institutions of higher education, especially those that educate teachers, human service organizations, health care organizations, and churches and other values-framing institutions.

Conceptually, we can think of schools as the center of the spider's web of influences identified in the previous chapter. The strands together determine how strong and sturdy the web will be in accomplishing its task;

____________________
Much of the discussion in this chapter comes from two papers by S. A. Waddock: ( 1993c), "The Spider's Web: Influences on School Performance." Business Horizons September-October. 39-48; and ( 1992a), "The Business Role in School Reform: From Feeling Good to System Change," The International Journal of Value-Based Management 5( 2): 105-126.

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Not by Schools Alone: Sharing Responsibility for America's Education Reform
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Note 5
  • Chapter 1 a Context of Change 7
  • Notes 24
  • Chapter 2: The Social Fabric of Education 29
  • Chapter 3 the Institutional Fabric of Education 49
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter 4 the Realities and Responsibilities of Education 77
  • Notes 93
  • Chapter 5 Not Alone: Outside in Thinking 95
  • Notes 111
  • Chapter 6 System Dynamics of School Failure 113
  • Notes 135
  • Chapter 7 Structure as Possibility 137
  • Chapter 8 Structure as Solution 161
  • Notes 175
  • Chapter 9 Networks and Schools 177
  • Notes 198
  • Chapter 10 Businesses and Other Employers Linked to Schools 199
  • Notes 215
  • Chapter 11 Conclusions 217
  • References 221
  • Index 231
  • About the Author 241
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