Waste-To-Energy in the United States: A Social and Economic Assessment

By T. Randall Curlee; Susan M. Schexnayder et al. | Go to book overview

certainties is explored in more detail in the case-study portion of this work (Chapter 6).


2.6 POTENTIAL FAILURES IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS

Advocates of a WTE facility at the community level will likely acknowledge that the most severe threat to a WTE project is a fundamental breakdown in the local decision-making process, irrespective of information on potential environmental damages, regulatory and financial risks, and technology uncertainties. Cursory evidence suggests that advocates of WTE generally have not reached out to community leaders in the early stages of the decision process. And once opposition is mounted, as it is in almost all cases, WTE advocates generally react strongly to that opposition. The debate about WTE often, therefore, shifts from an assessment of the facts and options to an all-out war among sides that have staked their positions more on ideology than on an unbiased assessment of the pros and cons of the various alternatives. WTE opponents may view WTE advocates as symbols of big business, financial greed, and everything that is "wrong" with our systems for environmental control. WTE proponents often view opposition groups as fanatical environmentalists with little ability to grasp the "reality of the situation."

Kreith ( 1992b) writes that "One of the most important reasons for this conflict is a lack of confidence by the public in the safety and reliability of some waste management technologies" (p. 3). Possibly more important is the public's general lack of trust in certain sources of information, particular pieces of information, and the manner in which decisions are made. Evidence (see Chapter 6) suggests that the public's perception of conflicting information and the subsequent politicization of WTE in the United States has caused WTE to be rejected in many communities; and in those communities that have actively planned a facility, the decision to abandon or proceed with that project often is based more on the minimization of political damage and less on an unbiased assessment of the relative merits of alternative MSW management approaches.


NOTES
1.
Household hazardous wastes typically make up about 1 percent of the municipal waste stream, or about 15 pounds per household per year. These hazardous wastes are difficult to manage because of their small percentages, the need for a sophisticated collection system, and the potential liabilities that are borne by collectors and processors. While curbside collection is not considered a viable option, several states have experimented with household hazardous waste "collection days" during which individuals can bring their hazardous wastes to a collection center for

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Waste-To-Energy in the United States: A Social and Economic Assessment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.