The Catholic Church in Mississippi, 1911-1984: A History

By Michael V. Namorato | Go to book overview

Depression/New Deal, World War II, and the 1960s civil rights movement. In the chapters that follow, all of this becomes clear. For the bishops, the changes in the state impacted what they had planned to do. In Bishop Gunn's case, for example, he built churches and was concerned with his congregations' accessibility to these churches. But he was also very much in the forefront of confronting the issue of black clergy within the South, especially Mississippi, strongly supporting St. Augustine's Seminary.

Bishop Gerow, on the other hand, steered clear of politics except in those instances where he was asked to cooperate or where he thought the church's position was being infringed upon. As for race, his abhorrence of violence was so intense that he accepted the status quo until the Medgar Evers assassination. Then he, too, changed his position. Finally, Bishop Joseph Brunini directly got involved in what was going on, particularly in the areas of school integration and social justice. He encouraged the aging Bishop Gerow to announce his 1964 and 1965 school integration policies. Also, Bishop Brunini was one of the founders and leaders of the Mississippi Religious Leadership Conference and committed the Mississippi Catholic Church to taking an active role in the political, economic, and social life of the state in which the church resided and of which it was very much a part.

How all this happened, the costs involved, and the long-term effects these developments had are the subject of what follows in Part I.


NOTES
1.
See, for example, Neil McMillen, Dark Journey: Black Mississippians in the Age of Jim Crow (Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 1989); The Citizens' Council: Organized Resistance to the Second Reconstruction ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994).
2.
See Richard McLemore, ed., A History of Mississippi, 2 vols. ( Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1973); James Cobb, The Selling of the South, 2d ed. ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1993).
3.
Twelve Southerners, I'll Take My Stand ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1973 reprint).
4.
See, for example, David Sansing, Mississippi: Its People and Culture ( Minneapolis: T. S. Denison, 1981); Ray Skates, Mississippi: A Bicentennial History ( New York: Norton, 1979).
5.
James Cobb and Michael Namorato, eds., The New Deal and the South ( Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1984); Roger Biles, The South and the New Deal ( Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1995).
6.
George Tindall, The Emergence of the New South, 1913-1945 ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1967), Chapters 16-20; Charles Roland, The Improbable Era: The South since World War II, rev. ed. ( Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1976), Chapter 4.
7.
See Emory Hawk, Economic History of the South (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1973 reprint), Chapters 16-17.
8.
David Goldfield, "The South," in Stanley Kutler, ed., Encyclopedia of the United States in the Twentieth-Century ( New York: MacMillan Library Reference, 1996), pp. 61-77; David Sansing, Making Haste Slowly: The Troubled History of Higher Education in Mississippi ( Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1990).

-25-

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The Catholic Church in Mississippi, 1911-1984: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 18
  • Part I - The Hierarchy 21
  • Notes 25
  • 1 - John E. Gunn, 1911-1924 29
  • 2 - Richard O. Gerow: The Natchez Years, 1924-1948 51
  • Notes 68
  • 3 - Richard O. Gerow: The Jackson Years, 1948-1966 75
  • Notes 93
  • 4 - Joseph Bernard Brunini: A Native Son 101
  • 5: Joseph Bernard Brunini 131
  • Part II - Clergy, Religious, and Laity 153
  • 6 - Clergy and Religious, 1911-1984 157
  • 7: Laity 183
  • 8: Outreach (Evangelization) 211
  • 9: Mississippi and Southern Catholicism 243
  • Epilogue 253
  • Notes 258
  • Appendix 1 Native Priests 259
  • Appendix 2 Priests in the Diocese, 1911-1984 261
  • Appendix 3 Irish Priests 285
  • Appendix 4 Religious Orders 289
  • Appendix 5 PARISHES, 1911-1984 293
  • Appendix 6 Schools 297
  • Selected Bibliography 301
  • Index 307
  • About the Author 315
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