The Carter Implosion: Jimmy Carter and the Amateur Style of Diplomacy

By Donald S. Spencer | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Most twentieth century presidents are best remembered for the promises they failed to keep. Woodrow Wilson boasted in 1916 that "He kept us out of war"; Herbert Hoover predicted--perfectly plausibly, given the golden conditions of 1928--that his term would witness the final triumph over poverty in the United States; Franklin Roosevelt's Democratic Party pledged to deliver balanced budgets after 1932, as well as "a saving of not less than 25 percent in the cost of the federal government"; Lyndon Johnson assured the nation in 1964, "We don't want our American boys to do the fighting for Asian boys"; Richard Nixon promised to mold an effective national crusade for law and order, and to win peace with honor in the jungles of Southeast Asia; Ronald Reagan promised above all else to balance the federal budget. Of all of this nation's twentieth century presidents, perhaps only Calvin Coolidge fully satisfied the expectations of those who gave him their ballots: he promised little more than to sit down and keep quiet.

None of these promises can be dismissed as patently dishonest in their inception. Yet each stands as an ironic and troubling counterpoint to its author's most famous deeds. Presidents, even imperial ones, eventually must confront problems outside the narrow context of partisan rhetoric. They must adapt to changing realities, respond to unexpected crises, and design policies that will somehow satisfy Congress, the courts, and their own bureaucracies. And thus trapped within the awkward perimeters of practical choice, every president eventually discovers that even his most sincere promises bear little resemblance to the decisions he must make.

One political truth seems clear. It is by their husbandry of the nation's

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Carter Implosion: Jimmy Carter and the Amateur Style of Diplomacy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 166

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.