The Carter Implosion: Jimmy Carter and the Amateur Style of Diplomacy

By Donald S. Spencer | Go to book overview

proponents' wildest dreams constitutes one of this century's towering triumphs.

What was required in the late 1970s was a magnitude of vision and a quality of presidential courage at least equal to those of Roosevelt and Truman. Whether the Nixon-Ford-Kissinger strategy of detente might have led eventually to Soviet-American cooperation in defusing the potential for further military proliferation in the Third World--and whether a massive new Marshall Plan for Africa might have addressed the gravest human tragedy in modern history--cannot be known. For the Carter White House, the psychic rewards of moralistic rhetoric precluded efforts of greater and more immediate practicality.


NOTES
1.
I have been unable to relocate the article by M. Potts which contained this statement. I have, however, replicated the arithmetic, which is more complicated than it looks.
2.
Cyrus Vance, "America's Commitment to Third World Development," Department of State Bulletin, May 1979, p. 33. See also H. W. Singer, "The New International Economic Order: An Overview," Journal of Modern African Studies, 1978, pp. 539-548; Council on Environmental Quality, The Global 2000 Report to the President ( 3 vols., Washington, D.C., 1979); New York Times, February 2, 1975.
3.
Quoted in Robert Stryker, "Development Strategies," in Phyllis M. Martin and Patrick O'Meara, eds., Africa ( Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1977), p. 314.
4.
Timothy M. Shaw and Malcolm J. Grieve, "The Political Economy of Resources: Africa's Future in the Global Environment," Journal of Modern African Studies, March 1978, p. 11 and passim.
5.
David Lamb, The Africans ( New York: Random House, 1983), pp. 3-5.
6.
J. Gus Liebenow, "Africa in World Affairs," ibid., p. 400.
7.
Douglas W. Lister, "Africa in the World Economy," in C. Gregory Knight and James L. Newman, eds., Contemporary Africa: Geography and Change ( Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1976), p. 456.
8.
Shaw and Grieve, "Political Economy," p. 24; International Development Research Center, Catastrophe or New Society? ( Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 1976), pp. 91, 100, and passim.
9.
Paul T. Welty, The Asians: Their Heritage and Their Destiny ( New York: Harper and Row, 1966), p. 23.
10.
Quoted in New York Times, February 2, 1975.
11.
John Stoessinger, Henry Kissinger: The Anguish of Power ( New York: Norton, 1977), p. 161. William and Paul Paddock, Famine, 1975! America's Decision: Who Will Survive? ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1967).
12.
Garrett Hardin, quoted in Wade Greene, "Triage," p. 11. See also Jahangir Amuzegar , "Requiem for the North-South Conference," Foreign Affairs, October 1977, pp. 136-159, esp. p. 158.
13.
Hans Morgenthau, "Hans Morgenthau on Foreign Policy," World Issues, December 1977/ January 1978, pp. 10-16.

-139-

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The Carter Implosion: Jimmy Carter and the Amateur Style of Diplomacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 2 - Some One Syllable Answers 19
  • Notes 32
  • 3 - Sort of a Beacon Light. . . ."" 35
  • Notes 49
  • 5 - The Challenge of Khomeini 65
  • Notes 82
  • Notes 119
  • 8 THE MALTHUSIAN NIGHTMARE AND THE PARADOX OF INVERSE POWER 121
  • Notes 139
  • 9 - Jimmy Carter, Zachary Taylor, and the 800th Lifetime 143
  • Notes 154
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 155
  • Index 157
  • About the Author 163
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