The Carter Implosion: Jimmy Carter and the Amateur Style of Diplomacy

By Donald S. Spencer | Go to book overview

procedures seriously misread the gravity of the republic's dilemma and the destructive potential of the contemporary global crisis.

Either the Democratic and Republican parties will recognize these facts--and embrace the consequent imperative for nurturing and rewarding real statesmanship--or they both will continue to call forth Zachary Taylors and Jimmy Carters at too many moments of national peril.


NOTES
1.
Alvin Toffler, Future Shock ( New York: Random House, 1970), pp. 15-16.
3.
Department of State Press Release No. 549, October 8, 1953.
4.
Brainerd Dyer, Zachary Taylor ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1946), pp. 284-285.
5.
The standard biography is Holmon Hamilton, Zachary Taylor ( 2 vols., Indianapolis: Bobbs Merrill, 1951).
6.
One superb study of these themes is Allan Nevins, Ordeal of the Union ( 8 vols., New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1947).
7.
The classic expressions of this thesis are James G. Randall, "The Blundering Generation," Mississippi Valley Historical Review ( June 1940), pp. 3-28, and Avery Craven, The Coming of the Civil War ( New York: Charles Scribner and Sons, 1942).
8.
Washington Post, March 4, 1979.
9.
Life, June, 1979, pp. 34, 35.
10.
New York Times, February 21, 1979.
11.
Munich Suddeutsche Zeitung, July 19, 1980, quoted in World Press Review, September 1980, p. 20.
12.
New York Times, November 5, November 6, 1980.

-154-

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