Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training

By Philip Gaunt | Go to book overview

media by involving industry professionals in the accreditation process. In Canada, the industry has few formal channels through which to express its needs and priorities, and has to rely on open criticism, a situation that obviously leaves a great deal to be desired. Meanwhile, the system remains uncomfortably poised between the traditions of the Ivy League and the school of hard knocks.


NOTES
1.
Frank Luther Mott, American Journalism, A History: 1690-1960, 3d ed. ( New York: Macmillan, 1982), pp. 604-605.
2.
Burton W. Marvin, "United States of America: Journalism," in UNESCO, The Training of Journalists: A World-wide Study on the Training of Personnel for the Mass Media ( Paris: UNESCO, 1958), p. 111.
3.
Edwin Emery and Michael Emery, The Press and America: An Interpretive History of the Mass Media, 6th ed. ( Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1988), pp. 581-582.
4.
Philip Gaunt, Choosing the News: The Profit Factor in News Selection ( Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1990). See chap. 7.
5.
Ron Thornburg, "The Liberal Arts and Sciences," in Robert H. Giles, ed., Journalism Education: Facing Up to the Challenge of Change ( Washington, DC: American Society of Newspaper Editors Committee on Education for Journalism, 1990), p. 12.
6.
Lee B. Becker, "Enrollments Increase in 1989, but Graduation Rates Drop," Journalism Educator 45, no. 3 (Autumn 1990), p. 5.
7.
The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, 1988 Journalism Career and Scholarship Guide ( Princeton, NJ: Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, 1988), pp. 12-13.
8.
Marvin, "United States," pp. 111-112.
9.
David H. Weaver and G. Cleveland Wilhoit, "A Profile of JMC Educators: Traits, Attitudes and Values," Journalism Educator 43, no. 2 (Summer 1988), pp. 15-41.
10.
Jerry Ceppos, "Media Professionals as Teachers," in Giles, Journalism Education, p. 17.
11.
Maxwell McCombs, "Testing the Myths: A Statistical Review 1967- 1986," Gannett Center Journal 2, no. 2 (Spring 1988), pp. 101-108.
12.
Lee Becker, Jeffrey Fruit and Susan Caudill, with Sharon Dunwoody and Leonard Tipton, The Training and Hiring of Journalists ( Norwood, NJ: Ablex, 1987), p. 12.
13.
Communications 1990, a report of the Future Committee ( Columbia: School of Journalism, University of Columbia, MO, 1980).
14.
Warren K. Agee, Phillip H. Ault and Edwin Emery, Introduction to Mass Communication, 7th ed. ( New York: Harper and Row, 1982), p. 315.
15.
1991 Journalism Career and Scholarship Guide ( Princeton, NJ: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, Inc., 1990), p. 18.

-38-

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Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Notes 8
  • Chapter Two - Training Needs 11
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter Three - Training Structures 21
  • Chapter Four - the United States and Canada 29
  • Notes 38
  • Chapter Five - Western Europe 41
  • Notes 75
  • Chapter Six - Eastern and Central Europe 79
  • Notes 86
  • Chapter Seven - Asia and the Pacific 89
  • Notes 120
  • Chapter Eight Latin America and the Caribbean 123
  • Notes 134
  • Chapter Nine Africa 135
  • Notes 148
  • Chapter Ten North Africa and the Middle East 151
  • Notes 156
  • Chapter Eleven Challenges and Prospects 157
  • Appendix - Directory of Training Institutions 163
  • Selected Bibliography 215
  • Index 223
  • About the Author 235
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