Out of Thin Air: A History of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 1940-1990

By Andrew J. Butrica; Deborah G. Douglas | Go to book overview

companies during those prosperous years, Air Products would push forward aggressively to exploit all of the opportunities its managers could envisage. The entire nation would follow a similar path, confident that it could meet every challenge whether at home or overseas.


Notes
1.
Business Week, 30 July 1960.
2.
"Approval of 2-Year Pact Ends Air Products Strike," The Morning Call, 19 September 1958, p5; "Man Fined for Air Products Vandalism," The Morning Call, 7 October 1958, p. 16.
3.
Air Products negotiated the ten-year note with the Trustees of the Savings and Profit Sharing Pension Fund of Years, Roebuck and Co. Employess. It was later converted to common stock. Minutebook, Board of Directories, 16 September 1958.
4.
Leonard Pool, address to shop workers, 3 March 1947, APHO.
5.
Donald Cummings graduated with a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Yale University. He joined Air Products as a sales engineer in 1956.
6.
John Stewart earned his B.S.M.E. from Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1950 and then served as the Assistant to the President at Industrial Nucleonics Corporation in Columbus, Ohio. He Joined Air Products as a sales engineer in 1956.
7.
Auerbach Report, pp. 26-29.
8.
"The Industrial Gas Industry," Report by William Blair & Company, 16 September 1976, pp. 10-18, APHO.
9.
Lee Holt interview, 11 August 1988, APHO.
10.
"Southern Oxygen Growth and Operation Reviewed," The Cold Box ( August-September 1961): 3-7.
11.
Air Products and Chemical, Inc., "Listing Application to New York Stock Exchange," 25 September 1961, APHO.
12.
Air Products also added production capacity for the manufacture of welding supplies and equipment with the purchase of the Black Manufacturing Company of New Jersey, a manufacturer of welding supplies and equipment.
13.
Lee Holt interview, 11 August 1988, APHO.
14.
Michael Cushman had an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School. He Joined Air Products in 1960, after working for air Reduction as a salesman.
15.
Lanny Patten earned a B.S. in industrial from Iowa State University in 1956. After service in the Air Force, he joined Air Products in 1960.
16.
Frank Ryan joined Air Products in 1957. He graduated with a B.S.

-169-

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Out of Thin Air: A History of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 1940-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • PART I THE ROOTS OF ENTERPRISE 1
  • 1: The Entrepreneur and the Engineer 3
  • 2: Air Products at War 25
  • PART II COMING OF AGE 49
  • 3: Survival and Strategies 51
  • Notes 82
  • 4: Air Products Comes of Age 83
  • 5: The Technological Enterprise and Its Culture 109
  • PART III THE MODERN FIRM EMERGES 137
  • 6: Charting a New Course 139
  • Notes 169
  • 7: Investing in the Future 171
  • 8: Triumphs and Troubles 199
  • PART IV A FORTUNE 500 CORPORATION 231
  • 9: Maturity 233
  • Notes 261
  • 10: Planning for Growth 265
  • Notes 292
  • Technical Appendix 295
  • Note 301
  • Bibliography 303
  • Index 307
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