Against the Tide: Women Reformers in American Society

By Paul A. Cimbala; Randall M. Miller | Go to book overview
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the United Nations has finally committed to invest in Sanger's vision of comprehensive preventive health care for women.

In 1935 H. G. Wells raised his glass in an affectionate toast. "Alexander the Great changed a few boundaries and killed a certain number of men," Wells observed, "but he made no lasting change in civilization. Both he and Napoleon were forced into fame by circumstances outside themselves and by currents of the time, but Margaret Sanger made currents and circumstances. When the his tory of our civilization is written, it will be a biological history, and Margaret Sanger will be its heroine." 8 The words seem particularly well chosen in light of recent developments.


NOTES
1.
Erik H. Erikson, "Once More the Inner Space: Letter to a Former Student," in Jean Strouse, ed., Women & Analysis: Dialogues on Psychoanalytic Views of Femininity ( New York, 1974), 386.
2.
Margaret Sanger, An Autobiography ( New York, 1938), 89-92.
3.
The Woman Rebel 1 ( March 1914): 1, cited in Ellen Chesler, Woman of Valor: Margaret Sanger and the Birth Control Movement in America ( New York, 1992), 98.
4.
Sanger, An Autobiography, 243.
5.
Margaret Sanger, The Pivot of Civilization ( New York, 1922), 22-23.
6.
Journal of the American Medical Association 106 ( 1936); and American Medicine 41 ( 1935). Both cited in Chesler, Woman of Valor, 3 71).
7.
Birth Control Federation of America, "Birth Control and the Negro: An Analysis and Program" ( 1939), cited in Chesler, Woman of Valor, 388.
8.
Birth Control Information Center, London, "Round the World for Birth Control," in Chesler, Woman of Valor, 361.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chesler Ellen. Woman of Valor: Margaret Sanger and the Birth Control Movement in America. New York, 1992.

Cott Nancy F. The Grounding of Modern Feminism. New Haven, 1987.

Degler Carl N. In Search of Human Nature: The Decline and Revival of Darwinism in American Social Thought. New York, 1991.

Gordon Linda. Woman's Body, Woman's Right: A Social History of Birth Control in America. New York, 1976.

Kennedy David M. Birth Control in America: The Career of Margaret Sanger. New York, 1970.

Kevles Daniel J. In the Name of Eugenics: Genetics and the Uses of Human Heredity. New York, 1985.

Moore Gloria, and Ronald Moore. Margaret Sanger and the Birth Control Movement: A Bibliography, 1911-1984. Metuchen, N.J., 1986.

Piotrow Phyllis Tilson. World Population Policy: The United States Response. New York, 1973.

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