Against the Tide: Women Reformers in American Society

By Paul A. Cimbala; Randall M. Miller | Go to book overview

the 1990s, will have to consider some provocative questions. First, how important was the organized women's movement in enabling women to break down barriers to their educational and occupational advancement? Was the women's movement really "responsible" for later age at marriage, increased female participation in the workforce, and a declining birth rate--or did those developments cause the women's movement? Were the disputes between Friedan and NOW basically the result of personal animosities, or did they reveal deep, continuing fissures within the feminist movement? Also, how does one define and describe a "movement" that at certain times and on various issues involved literally millions of women and at other points attracted the support of only a handful of activists? These are all important questions that should be explored and answered. Yet there is a certain simplicity and truth in Friedan's statement that for her, and countless other women, "it [the movement] changed my life."


NOTES
1.
Betty Friedan, It Changed My Life ( New York, 1976), 75-91.
2.
Ibid., 87.
3.
Ibid., 90.
4.
Jo Freeman, The Politics of Women's Liberation ( New York, 1975), xi.
5.
Friedan, It Changed My Life, 106.
6.
Ibid., 109.
7.
Ibid., 142.
8.
Ibid., 155.
9.
Ibid., 140-141.
10.
Ibid., 175.
11.
Ibid., 245.
12.
Ibid., 258.
13.
Ibid., 325.
14.
Ibid., 324.
15.
Friedan, quoted in Current Biography Yearbook ( New York, 1989), 190.
16.
Betty Friedan, The Second Stage ( New York, 1981), 23, 95.
17.
Friedan, quoted in Current Biography Yearbook, 191.
18.
Betty Friedan, "How to Get the Women's Movement Moving Again," New York Times Magazine, 3 November 1985, p. 28.
19.
"Taking Issue with NOW," Newsweek 114 ( 14 August 1989): 21.
20.
"Feminism's Daughters," U.S. News and World Report 115 ( 27 September 1993): 71.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Atkinson Ti-Grace. Amazon Odyssey. New York, 1974.

"Betty Friedan." In Current Biography Yearbook, 188-192. New York, 1989.

Blow Richard. "Don't Look NOW," New Republic, 11 April 1988, pp. 11-12.

Bunch Charlotte. Passionate Politics. New York, 1986.

Carden Maron Lockwood. The New Feminist Movement. New York, 1974.

-164-

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Against the Tide: Women Reformers in American Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Catharine Beecher and Domestic Relations 1
  • Notes 16
  • Bibliography 17
  • Mary Ann Shadd Cary and Black Abolitionism 19
  • Notes 38
  • Bibliography 40
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Woman's Rights Movement 41
  • Notes 51
  • Bibliography 53
  • Dorothea Dix and Mental Health Reform 55
  • Notes 69
  • Bibliography 71
  • Frances Willard and Temperance 73
  • Notes 82
  • Bibliography 83
  • Jane Addams and the Settlement House Movement 85
  • Notes 97
  • Bibliography 98
  • Ida Wells-Barnett and the African-American Anti-Lynching Campaign 99
  • Notes 110
  • Bibliography 111
  • Jessie Daniel Ames and the White Women's Anti- Lynching Campaign 113
  • Notes 123
  • Bibliography 123
  • Margaret Sanger and the Birth Control Movement 125
  • Notes 136
  • Bibliography 137
  • Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement 139
  • Notes 151
  • Bibliography 152
  • Betty Friedan and the National Organization for Women 153
  • Notes 164
  • Bibliography 165
  • Index 167
  • About the Editors and Contributors 171
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