Bridging the Gap between Rich and Poor: American Economic Development Policy toward the Arab East, 1942-1949

By Nathan Godfried | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Prologue

The demand for, and the corresponding debate over, economic development of poor areas took recognizable shape during the 1940s. Most foreign policy histories of the 1940s and the Cold War era plunge into the decade's crises and great power conflicts.( 1) obsession with the "horizontal dimension of rivalry among the most powerful states" (e.g., the American- Soviet confrontation) obscures the vertical dimension of power--that is, "the domination and subordination of metropole over hinterland, centre over periphery, in a world political economy."( 2) Also lost in the morass of big power politics is an understanding of the "reciprocal and dynamic interaction" of polity and economy.( 3) A political economy perspective avoids these pitfalls and thus illuminates U.S.-Third World relations and the issue of economic development during the 1940s.


POLITICAL ECONOMY: CAPITALISM, CORPORATISM, AND THE WORLD SYSTEM

Taking a political economy approach to American foreign relations involves examining events on several planes and dimensions simultaneously. American policies toward the Third World derived from the internal needs of a capitalist and corporatist nation. Those policies also represented the demands and responsibilities of a hegemonic power in a capitalist world-economy. The following sections examine separately the internal and external determinants of American foreign relations. In practice these levels of analysis intersect and overlap.

A political economy perspective recognizes a reciprocal relationship between socioeconomic structures and political superstructures. An economic structure is a mode of production. It consists of a set of productive forces or means of production--for example, raw materials, tools, technology, skills, energy, and so forth. It also entails the ways people relate to one another in producing, distributing, and exchanging goods. These social relations of production describe who owns and/or controls the means of production, the division of labor, and the network of exchange relations. Social relations of production define class structure and class struggle

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bridging the Gap between Rich and Poor: American Economic Development Policy toward the Arab East, 1942-1949
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?