Haiti: The Failure of Politics

By Brian Weinstein; Aaron Segal | Go to book overview

For 188 years politics has failed to bring about a just and legitimate order in Haiti. Hobbes's war of all against all has been institutionalized in state and economic structures. This particular inversion of the social contract is not due to inevitable factors beyond human control. Haitians, with help from others, are capable of building a more just society. If they fail, then we all fail.


NOTES
1.
Crawford Young, The Politics of Cultural Pluralism ( Madison: University of Wisconsin, 1976) pp. 3, 23.
2.
Bryan Edwards, "Observations on the Maroon Negroes of the Island of Jamaica," and Silvia W. DeGroot, "The Bush Negro Chiefs Visit Africa: Diary of an Historic Trip," in Maroon Societies, ed. Richard Price ( New York: Anchor Press, 1973), pp. 227-46, 389-99.
3.
Eric Williams, From Columbus to Castro (History of the Caribbean 1492-1969) ( London: André Deutsch, 1970). Both as a historian and as a prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago, Dr. Williams considered the Haitian revolution to have left Haiti with a unique character in the region. See also Franklin W. Knight, The Caribbean, The Genesis of a Fragmented Nationalism ( New York: Oxford, 1978).
4.
K. O. Laurence, Immigration into the West Indies in the 19th Century ( Barbados: Caribbean Universities Press, 1971), pp. 20-45.
5.
Magnus Morner, Race Mixture in the History of Latin America ( Boston: Little Brown, 1967). Morner argues that during the nineteenth century most Latin American national identities were weak in societies still racially stratified.
6.
Guillermo O'Donnell, "Reflections on the Pattern of Change in the Bureaucratic- Authoritarian State," Latin American Research Review 13( 1978): pp. 3-38.
7.
Young, The Politics of Cultural Pluralism, pp. 66-98.
8.
Theodore Schultz, Investing in People ( Berkeley: University of California, 1982). Schultz has argued that peasant farmers are rational decision makers, given the constraints and risks associated with their choices.
9.
Robert I. Rotberg, with Christopher K. Clague, Haiti: The Politics of Squalor ( Boston: Houghton-Mifflin, 1971).
10.
Michel Laguerre, American Odyssey: Haitians in New York City ( Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1984).
11.
Mireille Neptune Anglade, L'autre moitié du développement à'propos du travail des femmes en Haïti ( Montreal: Editions des Alizés, 1986).

-185-

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Haiti: The Failure of Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Politics in Haiti 1
  • Notes 21
  • 2 - From U. S. Occupation to Duvalier Family Rule 25
  • Conclusion 49
  • Notes 50
  • 3 - Government by Franchise 53
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - Economic Hopes and Realities 79
  • Notes 101
  • 5 - Haiti: The First Third World" State?" 103
  • Notes 126
  • 6 - Can Haiti Survive? 129
  • Notes 145
  • 7 - Prospects for Democracy 147
  • Notes 168
  • 8 - Conclusion: Shaking Off the Past 171
  • Notes 185
  • Suggested Readings 187
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 195
  • About the Authors 204
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