Lives in Education: A Narrative of People and Ideas

By L. Glenn Smith; Joan K. Smith | Go to book overview

your personal history or from those of your defining groups that would change the way education operates? If your story and that of the significant groups in your life were adequately represented in the "big picture" histories of education, would that story change?

It is in this sense that we began the book by saying that whether or not you agree with our account, we hope you will be informed, strengthened, encouraged, and empowered. We all have the right to understand and explain ourselves. History is the means, not the end.


NOTES
1.
Even a majority of the members of the American Historical Association appear ready to concede that there is no such thing as "objective history." Peter Novick , That Noble Dream: The "Objectivity Question" and the American Historical Profession ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988).
2.
Diane Ravitch, The American Reader: Words that Moved a Nation ( New York: HarperCollins, 1990); Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., The Disuniting of America ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1992); E. D. Hirsch, Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987), and A First Dictionary of Cultural Literacy: What Our Children Need to Know ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1991); Allan Bloom, The Closing of the American Mind ( New York: Touchstone Books, 1988). Cf. Molefe Kete Asante, Afrocentricity: The Theory of Social Change ( Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press, 1990); Martin Bernal, Black Athena, Vol. 1: The Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilization: The Fabrication of Ancient Greece, 1785-1985, Vol. 2: The Archaeological and Documentary Evidence (Rutgers: Rutgers University Press, 1987- 1991).
3.
Floyd W. Hayes III, "Politics and Education in America's Multicultural Society: An African-American Studies Response to Allan Bloom," Journal of Ethnic Studies 17 (Summer 1989): 71.
4.
AACTE, "No One Model American: A Statement of Multicultural Education" ( Washington DC: American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, 1972),9.
5.
Ellen K. Coughlin, "New History of America Attempts to Make Good on the Claims of Multiculturalism," Chronicle of Higher Education, May 26, 1993, A9, quoting an interview with Dr. Takaki, in a review of Ronald Takaki, A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1993).

-445-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lives in Education: A Narrative of People and Ideas
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 460

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.