Depression and Aggression in Family Interaction

By Gerald R. Patterson | Go to book overview

Preface

Francis Bacon presented in elegant detail his model for a science that would move from "the skirmishings and slight attacks and desultory movements of the intellect . . . to the discovery of many new things of service to the life and state of man" ( Bacon, 1620/ 1947, p. 236). He visualized an interactive process where a consortium of investigators would examine, measure, weigh, and/or carry out experiments. This data base would, in turn, lead to new hypotheses, or axioms in his parlance, and thus create a demand for yet further experiments. "For our road does not lie on the level, but ascends and descends; first ascending to axioms, and then descending to works" (p. 240).

By working cooperatively, Bacon thought that it would be possible to solve problems heretofore open only to philosophical debate. From his perspective, a cooperative effort would soon produce solutions to ancient problems. These products would dot the intellectual landscape like cathedrals, each a monument to the great instauration. Within the social sciences, Bacon's dream has seldom been realized. Many of us work in isolation. Others are elitists who roam their oak forests, bronze sword in hand, protecting hidden treasure from the eyes of all but the initiated. In recent times, however, there have been several currents moving against these two traditions of scholarship. First, the funds for research are more limited now. Second, many of the questions are too complex to be solved by a single investigator. These and other considerations led to a decision by a working committee at NIMH to design a special conference of investigators. Each participant would be productively engaged in empirical studies of families, and all studies would include longitudinal designs. The conference would also include a sprinkling of investigators who are committed to the study of family therapy outcomes and process. The details of the participants and what occurred at the conference are discussed in the opening chapter of this volume.

-xi-

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Depression and Aggression in Family Interaction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • References xiv
  • 1: The Family Research Consortium: At the Crest of a Major Wave? 1
  • 2: Developmental Epidemiological Framework for Family Research on Depression and Aggression 11
  • References 46
  • 3: Methodological Issues in the Study of Family Violence 49
  • Conclusion 70
  • Acknowledgments 71
  • References 72
  • 4: How Marriages Change 75
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT 99
  • References 100
  • 5: A Contextual Approach to the Problem of Aversive Practices in Families 103
  • Conclusion 123
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 124
  • References 124
  • 6: Statistical Methods for Analyzing Family Interaction 131
  • Summary 165
  • Acknowledgments 165
  • References 166
  • 7: Family Environments of Depressed and Well Parents and Their Children: Issues of Research Methods 169
  • Conclusion 182
  • Acknowledgments 183
  • References 183
  • 8 - Maternal Depression, Marital Discord, and Children's Behavior: A Developmental Perspective 185
  • Acknowledgments 204
  • References 204
  • 9: Initiation and Maintenance of Process Disrupting Single- Mother Families 209
  • Acknowledgments 242
  • References 243
  • 10: Method Variance in Structural Equation Modeling: Living with "Glop" 247
  • References 276
  • 11: Reflections: A Conceptual Analysis and Synthesis 281
  • References 312
  • Author Index 315
  • Subject Index 325
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