Depression and Aggression in Family Interaction

By Gerald R. Patterson | Go to book overview

5
A Contextual Approach to the Problem of Aversive Practices in Families

Anthony Biglan Lewis Lewin Hyman Hops Oregon Research Institute

Aversive behavior is a cardinal feature of most family problems. It is not hard to see the central role of such practices when considering the related problems of child and spouse abuse (e.g., Straus & Hotaling, 1980). However, aversive control practices are also the chief problem in nonabusive families where there is marital discord or problems with aggressive or noncompliant children. Aversive behavior is found in families where the mother is depressed, families in which there are multiply handicapped children, and families where a member is in chronic pain. Moreover, it is becoming clear that families that use aversive control practices are the crucible for later societal problems, in that children growing up in them are likely to have difficulties in work, social, and familial roles in later life ( Eider, Caspi, & Downey, 1986). Thus, the control of aversive practices in families must be a fundamental goal for those interested in improving the welfare of families. Such control cannot be ignored by persons who have a primary interest in a productive society in which the costs of social dislocation are minimized.

The aversive behavior of individual family members can only be understood in the context of the social and nonsocial contingencies for that behavior. The most salient fact about that context is that it, too, is aversive. We therefore analyze the contingencies for the aversive behavior of individual family members in terms of experimentally derived principles of the effects of aversive events on behavior. These principles appear to encompass the most important ways in which aversive behavior is established and maintained in families. However, by itself such an analysis is incomplete. It does not address the ways in which the larger cultural context affects aversive practices in families. We therefore discuss the effects of the larger context on families' aversive practices using the framework provided by Harris' ( 1979) theory of cultural materialism.

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Depression and Aggression in Family Interaction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.