Depression and Aggression in Family Interaction

By Gerald R. Patterson | Go to book overview

11
Reflections: A Conceptual Analysis and Synthesis

Irving E. Sigel Educational Testing Service

Elaine Blechman Albert Einstein College of Medicine

This chapter attempts a synthesis of the papers in this volume. The papers represent different models of research directed at a common problem of interest--the study of depression and aggression in families. The fact that different models for research exist poses some critical problems for both research and practice. Because the goal of research in this area is to seek answers to questions about the pervasive impact of depression on family members, and hence develop treatment programs to alleviate the potential risks to members of families with depressive parents, there is good reason to create a coherent model of the illness and its consequences. The variety of contexts, constructs, mechanisms, and methods listed in Table 11. 1 show the diverse areas of interest.

Searching for commonalities among the diverse models is, we believe, a step toward more extensive and inclusive construction of models guiding research and practice dealing with the role of depression in the family context, particularly if we can systematize the relationships among the relevant variables.

As is well known in the physical sciences and often in medicine, researchers build on the shoulder of the predecessors. There is, overall, a continuous growth process where the accumulation of knowledge results in building a relatively integrated edifice. To be sure, this may be an idealized notion of how other scientific endeavors work, but nevertheless it seems clear that the physical and biological sciences develop common procedures and share a somewhat agreed upon notion of method that lead to replicable results of experiments. The behavioral sciences are not so blessed--at least not at this time. Investigators have greater license to develop their own theories, their own sets of procedures, and their own analyses resulting in considerable diversity. Further, there is not too much sharing of procedures and methods and there is relatively little replication

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Depression and Aggression in Family Interaction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • References xiv
  • 1: The Family Research Consortium: At the Crest of a Major Wave? 1
  • 2: Developmental Epidemiological Framework for Family Research on Depression and Aggression 11
  • References 46
  • 3: Methodological Issues in the Study of Family Violence 49
  • Conclusion 70
  • Acknowledgments 71
  • References 72
  • 4: How Marriages Change 75
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT 99
  • References 100
  • 5: A Contextual Approach to the Problem of Aversive Practices in Families 103
  • Conclusion 123
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 124
  • References 124
  • 6: Statistical Methods for Analyzing Family Interaction 131
  • Summary 165
  • Acknowledgments 165
  • References 166
  • 7: Family Environments of Depressed and Well Parents and Their Children: Issues of Research Methods 169
  • Conclusion 182
  • Acknowledgments 183
  • References 183
  • 8 - Maternal Depression, Marital Discord, and Children's Behavior: A Developmental Perspective 185
  • Acknowledgments 204
  • References 204
  • 9: Initiation and Maintenance of Process Disrupting Single- Mother Families 209
  • Acknowledgments 242
  • References 243
  • 10: Method Variance in Structural Equation Modeling: Living with "Glop" 247
  • References 276
  • 11: Reflections: A Conceptual Analysis and Synthesis 281
  • References 312
  • Author Index 315
  • Subject Index 325
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