Constructionism in Practice: Designing, Thinking, and Learning in a Digital World

By Yasmin Kafai; Mitchel Resnick | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Virtual reality applications in the fields of scientific visualization and training simulation often promote more meaningful user interaction, but are typically not situated within a virtual community. The chemist's walk-through molecular model would be more useful if placed in his or her virtual office where colleagues could come to visit. Current research in text-based virtual communities points to the importance of developing tools to allow the chemist to build his or her own virtual office. The chemist could fill the office with objects that are both useful and an expression of personal taste, some personally designed and some designed by others, just like those in a real office.

If the power of this technology is to be unleashed, users need to be the creators and not merely the consumers of virtual worlds. We believe that constructionist principles are of central importance to the design of virtual reality systems. MediaMOO is an exploration of this idea.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This chapter originally appeared in Convergence, 1 (1). An earlier version of this chapter was presented at the third International Conference on Cyberspace in Austin, Texas, on May 15th, 1993. The authors would like to thank the National Science Foundation (Grants 9153719-MDR, 9358519-RED), the LEGO Group, Interval Research, and AT&T for their support of this research. Thanks also are due to Pavel Curtis for his wonderful software. The authors thank the janitors and membership advisory committee of MediaMOO for volunteering their time to help make the project a success. Most of all, we thank MediaMOO's members.


REFERENCES

Bruckman A. ( 1992). Identity workshop: Social and psychological phenomena in text-based virtual reality. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Available via anonymous ftp from media.mit.edu in pub/ash/papers/identity-workshop.{ps.Z,rtf.Z}.)

Bruckman A. ( 1994). Programming for fun: MUDs as a context for collaborative learning. Boston, MA: International Society for Technology in Education. Available via anonymous ftp from media.mit.edu in pub/asb/papers/necc94.{ps.Z,rtf.Z,txt}.)

Curtis P. ( 1993). Mudding: Social phenomena in text-based virtual realities. Paper presented at the Directions and Implications of Advanced Computing, Berkeley, CA. (Available via anonymous ftp from parcftp.xerox.com in pub/MOO/papers/DIAC92.{ps,txt}.)

Curtis P., & Nichols D. ( 1993). MUDs grow up: Social virtual reality in the real world. Paper presented at the third International Conference on Cyberspace, Austin, TX. (Available via anonymous ftp from parcftp.xerox.com in pub/MOO/papers/MUDsGrowUp.{ps,txt}.)

Curtis P., & White S. ( 1994). MOO. Palo Alto, CA: Xerox PARC. (Available via anonymous ftp from parcftp.xerox.com in pub/MOO/LambdaMOO1.7.8p4.tar.Z.)

Oldenburg R. ( 1989). The great good place. New York: Paragon House.

Papert S. ( 1980). Mindstorms: Children, computers, and powerful ideas. New York: Basic Books.

Papert S. ( 1991). "Situating constructionism". In I. Harel & S. Papert (Eds.), Constructionism (pp. 1- 11). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Constructionism in Practice: Designing, Thinking, and Learning in a Digital World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.