Doing History: Investigating with Children in Elementary and Middle Schools

By Linda S. Levstik ; Keith C. Barton | Go to book overview

also hope that their example supports you and your students as you build communities of historical inquiry.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book grew out of a series of collaborations--with teachers and students, with each other, and with the many colleagues with whom we have discussed and debated the issues surrounding the teaching and learning of history. The teachers and students with whom we work have been incredibly generous, giving us feedback on many sections of the book and always providing a reality check on our theorizing. In addition, we want to thank the administrators who let us observe in their schools, supported our research, and welcomed our university students into their schools. Several people also read and responded to portions of the manuscript. Corinna Hasbach, Terrie Epstein, Raymond H. Muessig, and Noralee Frankel provided encouragement, insightful reviews, and useful suggestions. Lynne Smith provided technical assistance as well as a good "language arts" perspective. Frank Levstik assisted in locating a variety of sources. He and Jennifer Levstik read, listened to, and commented on more drafts of chapters than either probably cares to recall. Marge Artzer also provided valuable assistance, and Larry Newton provided at least one good line. Jennie Smith, Elaine Richardson, and Paula Bayer provided indispensable help in finding good children's literature. And Leslie Kreimer allowed us to investigate the impact of some of our ideas in new settings. We especially want to thank our families for their good humor and patience, and our editor, Naomi Silverman, for once again shepherding the book to completion.

-xiii-

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