Elitism, Populism, and European Politics

By Jack E. S. Hayward | Go to book overview

9
Mediating between the Powerless and the Powerful

GIANFRANCO PASQUINO


1. Some Preliminary Doubts

It is questionable whether organized interests mediate between the powerless and the powerful. In all likelihood, this function is still better fulfilled by political parties. Indeed, this may be the real problem. Organized interests do not really mediate, even where they organize their interests more or less successfully. Most of the time, they just put pressure on parties and office-holders on behalf of their most powerful members, leaders, and functionaries. Political parties are supposed to activate themselves in order to aggregate a wider spectrum of interests, but, according to some authors, they show a declining capability to do so; for their part, organized interests usually aim selectively at special and specialized constituencies. For electoral and political, in some cases even for ideological, reasons, parties may try to organize the powerless; organized interests may prefer to organize those already enjoying some power and possessing some resources.

The powerless and the resourceless own only their vote, but they are therefore of special interest to the political parties. Only those voters, groups, and interests who are capable of mobilizing on the basis of some shared interest and goal may become the target of organized groups. Exceptionally, social movements will appear capable of drawing into the political arena even the powerless. Though more restricted, public-interest movements will enjoy some mobilizing capabilities and acquire some political influence. They will be led by individuals who start with some important resources: organizational capabilities, socio- political visibility, information, and centrality in their sphere of action. The powerless seem to be destined to remain pawns in a complex political game and to be left aside whenever it may appear appropriate to the (relatively) powerful: the organizers, the leaders.

-190-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Elitism, Populism, and European Politics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 272

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.