Elitism, Populism, and European Politics

By Jack E. S. Hayward | Go to book overview

INDEX
Italic figures refer to tables.
Abeele, Michel Vanden247
Almond, Gabriel A. and Verba, Sidney (The Civic Culture) 145, 165, 175-6
apathy, see politics, public interest and trust in
Ashdown, Paddy75
Athens, ancient 11, 13, 26
Auriol, Vincent98
Australia, 116, 185
Balladur, Edouard90, 95
banks 28, 220-1, 226-8, 230, 236
Barre, Raymond28
Basle, as conference centre 239
Belgium7
Bentham, Jeremy38
Berlusconi, Silvio23, 121, 125
Blair, Tony22
Boulding, Kenneth E. 58
Bourdieu, Pierre95, 96
Britain:
decline of 129-30, 168-9
and EC/EU213-19
economics 168-9, 205, 207, 208-11, 213-16, 224, 229
election pledges 88-9
and European political debate 101, 110, 255
government majority 8
localism 6-7
1989 election 110
openness 172
policy-making 171
and proportional representation 119
public interest in politics 213
Britain, political parties:
alternatives to 181
Conservative 136, 177, 214
internal division 134-5
Labour 177, 182, 184
British Rights Survey 68-9, 71
Bryce, James13, 58
Bush, George57
Calhoun, John C. 169, 170
candidates, choice of 42-5
CAP (Common Agricultural Policy) 225-6
censorship 68, 71-5, 73, 74
élites and representation of public on 81
opposition to government 82-3, 83
public attitudes to 76-81, 78, 79, 80
'challenger' parties 23
change and stability, factors in pattern of 2-8
Chirac, Jacques28-9, 89-90
Christian democrats ( European People's Party) 113
Christopherson, Henning231
Churchill, Winston252
citizens:
individualization of 157-8
inert 14
institutions for protecting rights of 81-2, 82
as turning against government and governors 5-6
civil society, see citizens
class basis of politics eroded 2-3
Cockfield, Lord 254
Cold War, effects 3-4
Combes, Émile96
common consciousness 106-7
common good, demands and the 37-8
community of publics', features 14-15
'compensatory hypothesis' 53
'confidence gap' 143-5
conservatives, support for 3
constituents, abnegating responsibility for welfare of 58
control, personal and political 56-7
corporatism 4
corporatism, and pluralism: weakness of theories 191-5
corruption, political 4, 22, 26-7, 128-34

-259-

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Elitism, Populism, and European Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS x
  • Introduction Mediocre Élites Elected by Mediocre Peoples 1
  • Note 9
  • 1: The Populist Challenge to Élitist Democracy in Europe 10
  • Notes 30
  • 2 - 'Losing Touch' in a Democracy: Demands Versus Needs 33
  • Notes 60
  • 3: Freedom from the Press 67
  • Notes 86
  • 4: From Representative to Responsive Government? 88
  • Notes 99
  • 5: The European Union, the Political Class, and the People 101
  • Notes 120
  • 6: Political Parties and the Public Accountability of Leaders 121
  • Notes 141
  • 7: Élite-Mass Linkages in Europe: Legitimacy Crisis or Party Crisis? 143
  • Notes 160
  • 8: Organized Interests as Intermediaries 164
  • Notes 186
  • 9: Mediating between the Powerless and the Powerful 190
  • Notes 202
  • 10: Public Demands and Economic Constraints: All Italians Now? 203
  • Notes 219
  • 11: The Fluctuating Rationale of Monetary Union 220
  • 4: Conclusion 235
  • Notes 237
  • 12: Has Government by Committee Lost the Public's Confidence? 238
  • Notes 249
  • Conclusion Has European Unification by Stealth a Future? 252
  • Notes 257
  • Index 259
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