Demography and Retirement: The Twenty-First Century

By Anna M. Rappaport; Sylvester J. Schieber | Go to book overview

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Overview

Anna M. Rappaport, F.S.A. and Sylvester J. Schieber


INTRODUCTION

Demographers, economists, and other social policy analysts are increasingly focusing their attention on the period after the turn of the century when the segment of the population born between 1946 and 1964 pass into their retirement years. This segment of the population, known as the baby boom, is extremely important because it is larger than any other segment of the population born during a comparable period. The sheer size of the baby boom suggests that it may pose special challenges to our national economy and retirement programs when its members retire.

As we anticipate the retirement of the baby boomers, it is important to prepare ourselves to accommodate the changes that their retirements will pose. We must determine ways so that the workers who will have to support the increased burden posed by the retired baby boomers will be sufficiently productive to meet this burden, while simultaneously meeting the workers' own consumption and investment needs. In order to be successful, we must pursue policies that will enhance the productivity of future workers to the maximum extent possible. This need to improve productivity implies that we must now be investing in new and more efficient ways of operating our economy. This implies that we should look carefully at our current national savings behavior and the role that federal fiscal policy plays in this area generally, and the specific role that it has on public and private programs aimed at providing retirement income security. If we do not begin to address these issues now, the baby boomers' retirement burden will be upon us before we are prepared.

This book presents the papers and comments from the Pension Research Council's Spring 1991 Symposium. It focuses on those issues related to the age structure of the population and patterns of retirement as well as our ability to anticipate how these might change in the future.

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Demography and Retirement: The Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • MEMBERS OF THE PENSION RESEARCH COUNCIL v
  • Purpose of the Council vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1: Overview 1
  • Introduction 1
  • 2: Demographic Change in the United States, 1970-2050 19
  • ENDNOTES 47
  • Stephen C. Goss 53
  • Barry Edmonston 57
  • Introduction 57
  • 3: Expected Changes in the Workforce and Implications for Labor Markets 73
  • Introduction 73
  • Joseph F. Quinn 105
  • 4: Can Our Social Insurance Systems Survive the Demographic Shifts of the Twenty-First Century? 111
  • Introduction 112
  • ENDNOTES 148
  • 5: The Impact of the Demographic Transition on Capital Formation 163
  • Introduction 163
  • ENDNOTES 180
  • Alicia H. Munnell 183
  • 6: Implications of Demographic Change for Design of Retirement Programs 189
  • 7: Trends in Health Among the American Population 225
  • Introduction 225
  • ENDNOTES 242
  • Discussions 243
  • 8: Population Aging and Retirement Policy: An International Perspective 255
  • Introduction 255
  • ENDNOTES 284
  • Robert J. Myers 293
  • Bibliography 297
  • Index 315
  • Contributors 323
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