Essays on Modern Quebec Theater

By Joseph I. Donohoe Jr.; Jonathan M. Weiss | Go to book overview

Preface

T he present volume arises from an effort to bring together the best people working in the area, independently of critical stance or national origin, to celebrate the arresting development and undeniable richness of Quebec theater as it has emerged over the last three or four decades. To that end, we invited essays from a group of publishing scholars from Quebec, Anglophone Canada, France, and the United States. While imposing no rigid criteria on the collection, other than the inherent interest of the piece and the use of the cultural revolution of the 1960s as a common point of reference, we were able nonetheless without great difficulty to organize the articles submitted under the rubrics of culture, language, contemporary critical perspectives, and essays on individual plays or authors. We believe that we have succeeded in including, if not everyone whose work we value, at least a number of the most thought-provoking contemporary critical voices. The final product is a wide-ranging, comprehensive mosaic of ideas and insights which we hope will prove stimulating not only to the student of Quebec theater but, to the extent that Quebec will be seen to have broken new ground in dramatic theory and stage practice, to students of theater in general.

The often-remarked sympathy between growing national consciousness and the vitality of the stage would most probably have cast the Quiet Revolution--had we not done so--in the role of organizational center for the essays of this collection. No surprise then that a number of the essays concern themselves with the interrelated issues of language (including translation) and cultural identity which lay at

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