France and America in the Revolutionary Era: The Life of Jacques-Donatien Leray de Chaumont, 1725-1803

By Thomas J. Schaeper | Go to book overview

9
JOHN PAUL JONES: ENEMY

PROBLEMS IN THE TEXEL

Jones remained in the Netherlands from 3 October to 27 December 1779. On the whole, his experiences there were not happy. The general populace greeted the conquering hero with applause and newly composed songs, but Dutch officials did not welcome his appearance on their shores. The United Provinces was still neutral in the conflict. Soon after Jones arrived the British ambassador, Sir Joseph Yorke, argued that the squadron consisted of rebels and pirates, not legitimate belligerents. Thus, under threat of war, Yorke insisted that the Dutch expel Jones and return the Serapis and Countess of Scarborough to the George III's navy. The Dutch stadholder, the Prince of Orange, favored the British and wished to comply with their wishes. Fortunately for Jones, however, the Patriot Party, which tended to control the States General, sympathized with the American cause. The result was a stalemate. Jones got some of the things he needed in Holland, but not without a struggle.

There were three persons in Holland endeavoring to help him. One was the French ambassador, the duc de La Vauguyon. The other two were the American agent Dumas and the merchant- banker Jean de Neufville. Working under orders from Vergennes and Sartine, La Vauguyon represented Jones before the Dutch government. Dumas and Neufville received their orders from Franklin and, even more, from Chaumont.

Neufville was an old trading partner of Chaumont. Prior to the arrival of Jones's squadron in the Texel, Chaumont had instructed Dumas to do all that he could to assist Neufville in providing for the needs of the ships once they reached port. Though

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France and America in the Revolutionary Era: The Life of Jacques-Donatien Leray de Chaumont, 1725-1803
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Preface viii
  • 1 - CHAUMONT'S FIRST FIFTY YEARS 1
  • 2 - FRANCE AND THE COMING OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 38
  • 3 - CHAUMONT ENTERS THE PICTURE 63
  • 4 - BENJAMIN FRANKLIN'S LANDLORD 92
  • 5 - CHAUMONT AS FRIEND, ASSOCIATE, AND ENEMY 122
  • 6 - CONGRESSIONAL SUPPLIES 156
  • 7 - PRIVATE TRADE WITH AMERICA 194
  • 8 - JOHN PAUL JONES: FRIEND 227
  • 9 - JOHN PAUL JONES: ENEMY 254
  • 10 - FINANCIAL RUIN 290
  • 11 - TWILIGHT YEARS 319
  • Appendix 348
  • Bibliography 349
  • Index 377
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