INTRODUCTION

THE happy traveller who approaches Greece may enter, like most of her barbarian invaders, from the mountains of the north or, like the Roman, from the western sea. The sea-gate is perhaps even finer. And more sudden. Here at first sight stands revealed the character of Hellas, in full contrast to her richer sister, Italy. Yesterday the eye rested on the green hills of Samnium, the sun-baked flats of Apulia: but now, beyond the Straits of Otranto, dawn reddens on gaunt mountains towering like a rampart sheer from the Ionian Sea. No European coast I know, but Norway, stands up in such grim splendour. All day one's ship steams southward -- past fertile Corcȳra (Corfu), perhaps the ancient Phaeacia that sent the sea-worn Odysseus home; past the death-grey ranges of Epīrus, where Ácheron and Cōcȳtus, the infernal rivers of Woe and Wailing, wind through dark gorges down to the shore that rang with unseen lamentations one night two thousand years ago, at the news that Pan was dead; past the gulf of Actium, ringed with the mountains that watched Antony lose a world for Cleopatra; past the sheer white Leucadian headland of Sappho's legendary leap; past the rugged little Ithaca of Odysseus, nestling beneath Mount Nēritus, bare now of the 'tossing leaves' that Homer knew; past the low coasts of Cálydon and Missolonghi, where Meleāger died for Atalanta and Byron for Greece -- to anchor under Mount Panachaïcus in the harbour of Patras.

The northern land-gate through Jugoslavia brings contrasts of a different kind. In March the snowflakes may still be drifting down on that dreary Siberian plain south of the Drave, a muddy infinitude beneath a muddy sky, broken at last by the great mud-brown swirl of Save and Danube as they meet before Belgrade. South from Belgrade, gaunt and black on its height amid the snow, the train pants up the gorges of featureless hills towards Nish and the watershed of the Aegean; till beyond it, on a moorland desolate as Rannoch, watched from eastward by the blue peaks of Thrace, winter vanishes and there comes a sudden sense of the approaching south, of the magic of the Mediterranean world. The same night at the frontier station of Ghevghelí (in those happier years before the states of eastern Europe had become a block of prisons) the traveller would suddenly see shining out of the darkness a word in Greek characters -- AIΌOUɛA. It was a word he had last encountered in Homer; but three thousand years had not killed it; it had merely changed its meaning from the 'vestibule' of an Achaean king to the 'waiting-room' of a modern railway. And one felt, suddenly, as if at last one had come home.

-xxv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Greek Poetry for Everyman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xxv
  • Part One - Epic Period 1
  • Homer - Iliad 3
  • Notes 180
  • Hesiod of Ascra - (c. 800 B.C.?) 195
  • The Homeric Hymns 207
  • Hesiod and Hymns - Notes 224
  • Part Two - From Archilochus to Alexander 231
  • Archilochus of Paros 233
  • Part Three - Alexandrian Period 295
  • Philetas of Cos 297
  • Part Four - Roman and Early Byzantine Period 349
  • MeleĀger of Gadara 351
  • Appendix I 397
  • Appendix II 405
  • Index of Poets 413
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.