Yellowstone and the Great West: Journals, Letters, and Images from the 1871 Hayden Expedition

By Marlene Deahl Merrill | Go to book overview
Save to active project

2
Salt Lake City and Ogden

THURSDAY, JUNE 1

Mr. Adams, who accompanied me to this city, and myself sallied from the Townsend House after breakfast to see this world renowned city. It has often been described, and a repetition would be useless. The features which first attract the attention of strangers, and which can never fail greatly to interest and please, are the great breadth of the streets and the ever flowing rivulets which sparkle along their sides. The streets are well graded and graveled and make excellent drives for carriages, while the mountain streams convey everywhere abundant supplies of water dispersing fertility and life and imparting to the atmosphere a delightsome sense of refreshing coolness.

Our first point was the Tabernacle.1 We are admitted to the walled enclosure, and by applying at the office were politely attended by the person in charge who seemed happy to answer our main inquiries.

The Tabernacle is the great place of Convocation for the Mormons. It is a plain structure of peculiar form, huge proportions -- an immense ellipse -- the chief axes of which are 250 and 200 feet. Its roof is of shingle, an elliptical dome -- looking for all the world like the cover to a soup dish.

Its form makes it a complete whispering gallery, and the speaker near one end, it is said, can be heard distinctly in any part of the house.

At the extreme next end is the organ -- an immense affair now in process of building by Mormon artisans. The case is completed showing heavy ornamentation of carved work. Many additional sets of pipes are yet to be made.

Everything else about the budding is vividly plain -- paint even being discarded. On either side of the organ are the seats for the singers. In front

____________________
Panorama 2. Ogden Campground, June 3-10

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Yellowstone and the Great West: Journals, Letters, and Images from the 1871 Hayden Expedition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.