Yellowstone and the Great West: Journals, Letters, and Images from the 1871 Hayden Expedition

By Marlene Deahl Merrill | Go to book overview

10
To the Jefferson Valley, the Beaverhead, Fort Hall, and Salt Lake City

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

I was up early and packed up my bedding etc. After breakfast we struck tents and packed. The wagons were all very full as we have turned in two and one of the Ambulances. After we were pretty nearly ready I took the Doctor's horse over to the Fort to him. Going back to Camp afterwards I found the train just starting out. I went back to the Post and bid goodbye to all and went up to the hospital and bid Dr. Campbell goodbye. The Ambulance went up to the hospital for Ed Flint.

When we got to Bozeman we stopped about a half an hour. I saw Jeff Stanford and some of the other men who were with Barlow. I also saw Nebraska Bill. Charlie introduced me to a Frank Kneass of Philadelphia who is in charge of a party of engineers of the Northern Pacific Rail Road here.1 They are going out to stay until January. They will take an escort from Fort Ellis.

Leaving Bozeman we took a Northwesterly direction across the country going down the Gallatin Valley. Our way lay between wheat and oat fields in which the grain was stacked. We passed a number of ranches. The mountains away off to our right [ Gallatin Range] were only dimly seen being covered with haze. We crossed the Gallatin, fording it, and soon after went into Camp having come 21 miles. We are near a place called Hamilton [ Manhattan] having come 21 miles from Fort Ellis.2 After dinner I gathered some shells from the creek near us. I also got some plants from the same creek. We fed our horses and then turned them out again on herd. The guard tonight will be doubled.

Camp on small creek near Hamilton [ Manhattan]

____________________
Panorama 10. Beaverhead Rock and Bridge, September 9

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Yellowstone and the Great West: Journals, Letters, and Images from the 1871 Hayden Expedition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.