Yellowstone and the Great West: Journals, Letters, and Images from the 1871 Hayden Expedition

By Marlene Deahl Merrill | Go to book overview

Afterword

As Ferdinand Hayden and Albert Peale explored railroad cuts west of Evanston, Wyoming Territory, William Henry Jackson (at Hayden's request) was taking a side trip of his own in the opposite direction. With "Charlie" Turnbull serving as his assistant, the two traveled to Nebraska, where Jackson photographed tribal members and their dwellings at Pawnee villages (on the Loup Fork) and the Omaha Reservation on the Missouri River.1

Once back in Washington, Hayden devoted his considerable energies to publicizing the results of the expedition, writing his official report, and making arrangements for the distribution of the survey's collected specimens. Even before the survey ended, he had written Joseph Leidy that the party had accumulated an "immense amount" of material for investigation -- "more than ever before in the same length of time." Indeed it had. Forty- five large boxes containing more than one thousand specimens of minerals (including specimens from the hot springs), more than six hundred specimens of rocks, large numbers of mammal and bird skins, eggs, and other items had been sent during the expedition to the Smithsonian. A complete set of the collection would be kept and displayed there, and duplicate specimens would be distributed to selected colleges and universities.2

In November, George Allen received a letter in Oberlin from Albert Peale that described other kinds of post-survey activities:


WASHINGTON, D.C., NOV. 27TH, 1871

My Dear Professor:

Having a little leisure time this evening I think I could not employ it more pleasantly than in writing you. I have been wishing to do so for some time but have been so busy that I found it impossible until now.

I am very comfortably fixed here in the same building with Jackson who

-203-

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