Yellowstone and the Great West: Journals, Letters, and Images from the 1871 Hayden Expedition

By Marlene Deahl Merrill | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1.
Manning 1967, 216.
2.
Mike Foster Strange Genius ( 1994) remains the only full-length biography of Ferdinand Hayden and is the most complete and detailed source of information about him. The entry for Hayden in the Biographical Dictionary of American and Canadian Naturalists and Environmentalists ( Sterling et al., 1997), 355-58, provides key information about Hayden's scientific accomplishments. For specific references, see Foster 1994, cover leaf; Cassidy 1991, 3; Sterling et al. 1997, 356; and Rabbitt 1989,6, 109.
3.
Hayden's philosophy of government survey work appears in his official reports and in his 1877 Sketch of the Origin and Progress of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories. More can be found in several untitled documents that appear to be drafts of letters or articles, all written in Hayden's hand (Hayden Survey Papers, microfilm 623, reel 5, NA). Hayden's ability to popularize science and geology is best revealed in his official reports, which have been aptly described as "a kind of scientific exposition through travelog" ( Foster 1994, 116).
4.
Hayden to Allen, Sept. 2, 1871, OCA. Hayden often used this phrase or the phrase "The Great West." He used the latter as a book title in 1880, and the phrase appeared in many other Hayden articles and books, including his volume Sun Pictures ( 1870), where he writes, "Never in the history of our country has the term, "The Great West' possessed so much significance as at the present time . . . farms and villages with sites of future cities dotted over the plains and mountain slopes as they stretch westward to the setting sun" ( Hales 1988, 10 n.9).
5.
Lamar 1977, 992-93.
6.
Eleven men (one-third of the Frémont party) perished when they became stranded in the virtually impenetrable San Juan Mountains during winter storms ( Viola 1987, 107-9).

-235-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Yellowstone and the Great West: Journals, Letters, and Images from the 1871 Hayden Expedition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.