Copyrighting Culture: The Political Economy of Intellectual Property

By Ronald V. Bettig | Go to book overview

mate measure of concentration. The result, as political economists of communications consistently point out, is that the views and accounts of the world held by the capitalist class and aligned class factions and groups are broadly disseminated and persistently publicized.128 At the same time, the voices and groups that are most consistent in their challenges to the dominant groups lack economic power and resources to make themselves heard. Or they find their movements and messages captured and distorted through hegemonic media production practices. A commonly recognized influence is the need for commercial success in order to generate the revenues necessary to recover costs and make profits. This in turn narrows the range of material available in the mass media as market forces exclude all but the most commercially successful products.

The pervasiveness of "ruling-class views," hegemonic media practices, and the lack of alternative and critical views helps to maintain class inequalities and undemocratic social relationships. The state and the law play an important supporting role in this domination, and it is to these institutions that attention is turned in the following chapters.


Notes
1
Thomas Jefferson, The Portable Thomas Jefferson, New York: Penguin Books, 1985, p. 530.
2
Stanley M. Besen, New Technologies and Intellectual Property: An Economic Analysis, Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 1987, p. 1.
3
W. Curtiss Priest, "The Character of Information: Characteristics and Properties of Information Related to Issues Concerning Intellectual Property", Washington, DC: Office of Technology Assessment, February 1985, p. 17.
4
Priest, p. 20.
5
Besen, p. 7.
6
Priest, p. 20.
7
Nicholas Garnham, Capitalism and Communication, Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1990, p. 40.
8
Robert Sklar, Movie-Made America: A Cultural History of American Movies, New York: Vintage Books, 1975, p. 11.
9
Thomas Guback, "The Evolution of the Motion Picture Theater Business in the 1980s", Journal of Communication, 37:2, 1987, pp. 60-77.
10
Robert C. Allen, "The Movies in Vaudeville: Historical Context of the Movies as Popular Entertainment", in Tino Balio (ed.), The American Film Industry, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1985, pp. 57-82.
11
Tino Balio, "Part I: A Novelty Spawns Small Businesses, 1894-1908", in Balio (ed.), pp. 3-25, p. 20.
12
The 1909 Copyright Act applied to books; periodicals, including newspapers; lectures, sermons, addresses prepared for oral delivery; dramatic or dramatico-musical compositions; musical compositions; maps; works of art; models or designs for works of art; reproductions of works of art; drawings or plastic works of a scientific or technical character; photographs; prints and pictorial illustrations. 60th Congress, Sess. II, Chapter 320, Sec. 5(a)-(k). The act also granted the copyright owner the right to authorize translation,

-110-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Copyrighting Culture: The Political Economy of Intellectual Property
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.