Creating Minds: An Anatomy of Creativity Seen through the Lives of Freud, Einstein, Picasso, Stravinsky, Eliot, Graham, and Gandhi

By Howard Gardner | Go to book overview

Epilogue:
The Modern Era and Beyond

In characterizing an era with a specific label--indeed, in defining an era altogether--one runs the risk of making a claim that cannot be substantiated. It is perhaps least contentious simply to sort on the basis of numerical units, contrasting the seventeenth century with the eighteenth or, perhaps in Time magazine fashion, treating each decade of the century as a separate entity. However, purely chronological division has its costs. In drawing an arbitrary line at 1800, for example, one may ignore political watersheds like 1776 or 1789 or 1815, each of which seems far more important for the understanding of historical trends. And one misses the opportunity to define epochs in meaningful terms--for example, the period from 1815 to 1914 (a period of relative peace on the European continent) or the period of 1914 to 1989 (the two world wars and the cold war).


The Problem

In writing of the modern era, I am clearly transcending a purely chronological metric and averting a political delineation of eras. The term modern era is put forth in the same spirit as one might speak of the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlighterunent, or the romantic era. And just as each of these refers, roughly, to the centuries following 1500, the term modern era is designed to refer to the personalities, events, and, above all, the ideas that have dominated the twentieth century in the West. At the same time, I intend no slavish adherence to the span 1900 to 2000. At least two of these seven modern masters, Freud and Gandhi, accomplished considerable work before 1900; and the last of the surviving titans, Graham, died in 1991.

-391-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creating Minds: An Anatomy of Creativity Seen through the Lives of Freud, Einstein, Picasso, Stravinsky, Eliot, Graham, and Gandhi
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Chance Encounters in Wartime Zurich 3
  • 2 - Approaches to Creativity 19
  • Part II - The Creators of the Modern Era 47
  • 3 - Sigmund Freud: Alone with the World 49
  • 4 - Albert Einstein: The Perennial Child 87
  • 5 - Pablo Picasso: Prodigiousness and Beyond 137
  • 6 - Igor Stravinsky: The Poetics and Politics of Music 187
  • 7 - T. S. Eliot: The Marginal Master 227
  • 8 - Martha Graham: Discovering the Dance of America 265
  • 9 - Mahatma Gandhi: A Hold upon Others 311
  • Part III - Conclusion 357
  • 10 - Creativity across the Domains 359
  • Epilogue: - The Modern Era and Beyond 391
  • Notes 407
  • Bibliography 435
  • Name Index 451
  • Subject Index 458
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 464

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.