Taiwan: Nation-State or Province?

By John F. Copper | Go to book overview

Nations in any form and has veto power over its admission. It has the support of the United States Department of State and many other governments for this position. On the other hand, the United Nations allows representation of non-nation-state representatives and, in the new world order, is endeavoring to be more universal.

Taipei charges that not being allowed a voice in the U.N. and other bodies is based on a "myth" (reminding one of the argument used to support Beijing's application in the 1960s) that Taiwan does not exist. It says that its exclusion is a violation of the human rights of its 21 million people; it further claims that its being the only nation in the world that is denied membership is not consonant with inclusive and nondiscriminating ideals of these organizations. Similarly, Taipei notes that it is a democratic nation and does not deserve the treatment it has received from the world body.

Taiwan has won increasing sympathy for its efforts to participate in international organizations. Its financial clout, particularly its foreign exchange holdings and the volume of its trade, seem to ensure that it will gain admission to some financial groups. Reason would also suggest it be allowed membership in regulatory organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (in view of the fact that Taiwan is a major producer of nuclear energy) and environmental and other such organizations. Notwithstanding the long odds of a breakthrough on this issue, Taipei might win admission to some important international organizations such as the World Trade Organization--maybe even some kind of participation, short of full membership, in the United Nations.


NOTES
1.
For details on Taiwan's early foreign contacts, see the books cited in the history section of the bibliography. There is no detailed study specifically on Taiwan's foreign relations before 1945.
2.
See W. W. Goddard, Formosa: A Study in Chinese History (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1966), p. 25. The author notes that in the year 1000 sugar, rice, tea, and dyes were exported to China in meaningful amounts.
3.
For a detailed study of Taiwan's external relations for the three decades after 1949, see Chiao Chiao Hsieh, Strategy for Survival: The Foreign Policy and External Relations of the Republic of China on Taiwan, 1959-79 ( London: Sherwood Press, 1985). For a more recent analysis, see Yu San Wang (ed.), Foreign Policy of the Republic of China on Taiwan ( New York: Praeger, 1990).
4.
Chiang's speech can be found in The China 1959-60 Yearbook ( Taipei: China Publishing Company, 1960), p. 947.
5.
Thomas E. Stolper, China, Taiwan and the Offshore Islands (Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1985), pp. 88-90. Also see David M. Finkelstein, Washington's Taiwan Dilemma: From Abandonment to Salvation (Fairfax, Va.: George Mason University Press, 1993). This agreement was formalized in a communiqué between Washington and Taipei. See

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Taiwan: Nation-State or Province?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Photographs ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1- The Land And The People 1
  • Notes 18
  • 2- History 21
  • Notes 48
  • 3- Society and Culture 53
  • Notes 86
  • 4- Political System 91
  • Notes 123
  • 5- The Economy 127
  • Notes 153
  • 6- Foreign And Military Policies 157
  • Notes 187
  • 7- The Future 191
  • Selected Bibliography 211
  • Index 219
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