Life Unworthy of Life: Racial Phobia and Mass Murder in Hitler's Germany

By James M. Glass | Go to book overview

FIVE
DOCUMENTARY EVIDENCE AGAINST INDIFFERENCE

By 1940, the Jewish population in Germany had withered. Those remaining had been isolated into "mysterious strangers living their lives at the edge of the village."1 Little, if any, communication existed between Jew and non-Jew. Did the German people experience relief at the removal of the Jewish population? If so, relief hardly indicates indifference. The historical literature, at least in terms of psychological explanation, is inconclusive. Kershaw and others argue that there is little evidence pointing to popular enthusiasm in Germany for the deportation of the Jews, especially after the outbreak of war.2

Silence, however, need not imply passive acquiescence. It could suggest a conscious effort to conceal strong enthusiasm for the exclusion of the Jewish population. Kershaw assumes that silence indicates indifference, but apparent indifference could mask a range of emotions extending from guilt to rage. It is a mistake to take expressions of sentiment at face value. Further, some historians disagree with the indifference thesis and find strong anti-Semitism within Germany through the 1940s.3

It is worth repeating that while the Nazis sought to keep the existence of the death camps secret, the enormous logistical requirements to supply the camps, their function as a source of slave labor, their importance in medical experiments, and the enormous quantity of goods shipped back to the Reich made it impossible to claim that

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Life Unworthy of Life: Racial Phobia and Mass Murder in Hitler's Germany
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.