The Condition of English: Literary Studies in a Changing Culture

By Avrom Fleishman | Go to book overview

Preface

The study of letters shall be no longer a name for pity, for doubt, and for sensual indulgence.

-- Emerson

Political correctness (PC) has come and gone--the slogan, that is, as an effective political weapon. Whatever realities it pointed to are still with us, but in muted form. Conservative commentators have turned to meatier game, while defenders of the academy, after making light of the charges, are now seeing the effects of an altered climate of opinion. Their response, when it has not been gestural--an I-told-you-so shrug or an embittered expletive--has taken foreseeable forms. For those like the mercurial Stanley Fish in Professional Correctness ( 1995), after long stirring the pot in a variety of trendy causes, it is time to renew respectability by returning to the interpretation of individual texts--shades of the New Criticism. For others, like the newly radicalized deconstructionist J. Hillis Miller, writing in Profession 96, a Modern Language Association journal, the scene is a darkened one of "corporate" (read: capitalist) resistance to avant-garde teachings, which takes the form of financial cutbacks and resulting unemployment.

On this latter cruel fact all can agree: in the mid- 1990s the Modern Language Association was reporting that fewer than half the new Ph.D.s in English and other literatures were finding tenure-track positions. Although behavioral causes of this condition have yet to be ascertained, sustained scrutiny is hin

-xi-

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The Condition of English: Literary Studies in a Changing Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1- Establishing Shot: Academics of the New Class 1
  • 2- Tracking Shot: Origins and Outcomes 25
  • 3- Wide Angle: The Condition of English 57
  • Close-Up: Educating a New York Jewish Radical 73
  • 5- Montage Sequence: An English Department 95
  • 6- Open Ending: Expanding English/Extending English 119
  • Appendix: Intellectuals and Intelligentsia 141
  • Selected Bibliography 149
  • Index 153
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