Neocolonialism American Style, 1960-2000

By William H. Blanchard | Go to book overview

countermove. CIA officers, with satchels full of Iranian rials, distributed money to the street people through the Mullahs. A mob rushed into the streets of Tehran calling "Down with Mossadegh." Pro-Mossadegh citizens, hearing the cry, joined in the opposition and violent streetfighting followed. In the ensuing conflict over 250 people were killed.

General Zahedi went to Mossadegh's house with his officers, in a tank at the head of the CIA-sponsored mob. When the mob could not keep up with the officers, the CIA hired taxis for them. This time the guards were shot and Mossadegh fled, but he was soon captured and put on trial for treason before a military court. At his trial he presented a document showing that the day before the mob riot Iran Bank had cashed a check for $390,000 made out to Edward G. Donally, an American.7 But his evidence was ignored.

Thus, Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, who assumed all the power and pomp of his dictatorial father, was placed on his peacock throne by the CIA.8 The change of leadership received the full support of the United States. In a few months there were over 900 American troops in Iran to support the shah and to train his army.


NOTES
1.
R. W. Cottam, Nationalism in Iran ( Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1964) pp. 107-172. See also A. A. Saikal, The Rise and Fall of the Shah (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980) pp. 1-123.
2.
A. C. Millspaugh, Americans in Persia ( New York: DeCapo Press, 1976) pp. 12- 19, quote, p.23.
3.
Ibid, p. 37.
5.
B. Nirumand, Iran:the New Imperialism in Action. ( New York: Monthly Review Press, 1969) p.39.
6.
W. O. Douglas, The DouglasLetters: Selections from the Private Papers of Justice William O. Douglas, edited by Melvin I. Urofsky (Bethesda: Adler and Adler, 1987) p. 282.
7.
Nirumand, Iran, pp. 83-88.
8.
See Saikal, Rise and Fall, pp. 1-123 for more details on the coup. In an interview with Amin Saikal, Loy Henderson, the American ambassador, confirmed the central role of the CIA in this coup and put the cost at "Millions of dollars." Those were pre-inflation dollars. Even John Foster Dulles, ( Eisenhower's secretary of state and the

-18-

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Neocolonialism American Style, 1960-2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • ACRONYMS xiii
  • 1- The Era of American Intervention 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2- The American Relationship With Iran 11
  • Notes 18
  • 3- Iran: the Rise of the Shah 21
  • Notes 29
  • 4- Jimmy Carter and the Fall Of the Shah 31
  • Notes 47
  • 5- Nicaragua: the Rise Of Somoza 51
  • Notes 63
  • 6- Somoza and the Carter Presidency 65
  • Notes 72
  • 7- Ronald Reagan And The Contras 75
  • EPILOGUE 95
  • EPILOGUE 96
  • 8- Money Money Money 101
  • Notes 122
  • 9- Losing Stature In The Philippines 127
  • Notes 141
  • 10- The Cia and the Nsc 143
  • Notes 155
  • Notes 155
  • 11- "The New World Order" 157
  • Notes 177
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 179
  • Index 183
  • About the Author 191
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