Alain Locke and Philosophy: A Quest for Cultural Pluralism

By Johnny Washington | Go to book overview

tural values, to integrate them into the present way of life, and thereby to envision future possibilities.

One of the weaknesses of Locke's position is that he overemphasized the importance of analyzing the cultural values of past civilizations. Although we need to focus our telescope on the past in order to understand the present, we must also focus on the present and future. Foresight is stressed by process philosophers such as Dewey and Whitehead. A combination of foresight and hindsight methodologies will strengthen Locke's scientific humanism and help overhaul education in both America and Africa.


NOTES
1.
Alain Locke, "The Need for a New Organon in Education," Goals for American Education ( New York: Conference On Science, Philosophy, and Religion, 1950), p. 201.
3.
Ibid.
5.
Ibid.
8.
Alain Locke, "Minorities and the Social Mind," Progressive Education 12 ( March 1935): 142-143.
10.
Ibid.
11.
Ibid.
12.
Ibid.
13.
Locke, "The Need for a New Organon in Education," p. 209.
14.
Ibid.
16.
Locke, "Values and Imperatives," in American Philosophy, Today and Tomorrow, eds. Sidney Hook and Horace M. Kallen ( New York: Lee Furman, 1935), p. 317.
17.
Locke, "The Need for a New Organon in Education," p. 208.
19.
Felix DuBois, Timbuctoo: The Mysterious, trans. Diana White ( New York: Negro University Press, 1969, originally published in 1896), p. 285.
20.
This paper was presented at the First Africana Philosophy Conference, Haverford, Pennsylvania, July 1982.

-119-

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Alain Locke and Philosophy: A Quest for Cultural Pluralism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • PRISM vii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xxxi
  • 1 - What is Black Philosophy? 1
  • Notes 22
  • 2 - Aspects of Alain Locke's Axiology 23
  • Notes 37
  • 3 - Alain Locke's Model of the Political Community 39
  • Notes 59
  • 4 - The Need for Global Democracy 61
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Messages to the Black Elite 78
  • Notes 98
  • 6 - Historical Studies in Education 100
  • Notes 119
  • Parity for Blacks in Education 120
  • Notes 141
  • 8 - Educating the Masses 143
  • Notes 153
  • 9 - The Need to Desegregate Schools 155
  • Notes 166
  • 10 - The New Negro's Contributions to American Culture 168
  • Notes 191
  • 11 - African Art and Culture 194
  • Notes 213
  • 12 - Alain Locke, Yesterday and Today 215
  • Notes 226
  • Selected Bibliography 227
  • Index 239
  • About the Author 247
  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies Series Advisers: John W. Blassingame and Henry Louis Gates, Jr. 249
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