The Political Role of the Military: An International Handbook

By Constantine P. Danopoulos; Cynthia Watson | Go to book overview

DENMARK

Henning S0+̸rensen

Danish civilian-military relations can be traced back twelve hundred years in writings. Consequently, any short historical description of civil-military relations in Denmark will have to be painted with a broad brush and therefore be personally biased.

In this chapter five civil-military topics will be touched upon: Denmark's security policy, defense policy, the organization of the armed forces, public opinion on defense matters, and finally a profile of the officer corps and its political opinion compared to that of the Danish population.


SECURITY POLICY

Any historical presentation of a country's security policy can be divided into different periods depending on the criterion used.

Two different criteria will be used for the description of Denmark's security policy over the last twelve hundred years. First is the official belief in and use of military power abroad, and second is the presence and/or absence of enemies and allies. In the first case three and in the second six different periods can be identified.

From 800 to 1810, Denmark believed in military power. However, from the beginning of the 1800s, this conviction shifted toward peaceful settlement of conflicts even in matters such as territorial disputes, independence, and ethnic upheavals, in which cases wars were normally to be waged.1 This peaceful security approach continued in the Cold War period2 as we pursued our security policy goals of stopping aggressions, defending democracies, and protecting human beings only verbally, never forcefully. A new and third phase, rather unnoticed, has been introduced. Since 1990, Denmark is prepared to apply military power to realize our security goals, that is, to die for these goals, to phrase it lyrically.

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The Political Role of the Military: An International Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Argentina 1
  • Notes 16
  • References 17
  • Brazil 19
  • Notes 34
  • References 41
  • Canada 42
  • Notes 53
  • References 54
  • China 55
  • Notes 67
  • References 70
  • Cuba 71
  • Notes 84
  • References 86
  • Denmark 88
  • Notes 100
  • References 105
  • Egypt 107
  • Notes 118
  • References 121
  • France 122
  • References 141
  • Germany 143
  • Notes 152
  • References 153
  • Greece 154
  • Notes 167
  • References 168
  • India 169
  • Notes 186
  • References 188
  • Indonesia 189
  • Notes 205
  • References 206
  • Iran 207
  • Israel 223
  • Notes 233
  • References 234
  • Japan 235
  • Notes 252
  • References 255
  • Kenya 256
  • Notes 269
  • References 270
  • Mexico 271
  • Notes 281
  • References 282
  • Netherlands 283
  • Notes 295
  • References 297
  • Nigeria 299
  • Notes 320
  • References 322
  • North Korea 323
  • Notes 335
  • References 337
  • Peru 338
  • Notes 355
  • References 360
  • Poland 361
  • Notes 371
  • References 373
  • Republic of South Africa 374
  • Notes 387
  • References 390
  • Russia and the Former Soviet Union 391
  • Notes 401
  • References 403
  • United Kingdom 404
  • Notes 415
  • United States 420
  • Notes 437
  • References 439
  • Zaire 440
  • Notes 456
  • References 458
  • Index 459
  • CONTRIBUTORS 515
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