Infidels and Heretics: An Agnostic's Anthology

By Clarence Darrow; Wallace Rice | Go to book overview

Knowledge is the knowing that we cannot know.

-- Ralph Waldo Emerson


INFIDELS AND HERETICS
An Agnostic's Anthology

By
CLARENCE DARROW
and WALLACE RICE

The Stratford Company, Publishers Boston, Massachusetts

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Infidels and Heretics: An Agnostic's Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgment *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction *
  • I Foundation Stones 1
  • Agnosticism 3
  • "Agnosticism" Misused 4
  • Natural Selection 4
  • The Unknowable 6
  • The Unknowable 7
  • The Unknown God 8
  • An Agnostic Race 9
  • The Challenge of the Unknown 9
  • Gnostic Pride 10
  • Theology and Science 11
  • Forgotten Tools 11
  • Useless Natural Structures 12
  • Insoluble Doubt 13
  • First Principles 13
  • World-Beginnings for Children 15
  • II The Depths of Thought 17
  • On the Death of a Metaphysician 19
  • No Shame in Ignorance 19
  • Knowledge of Ignorance 21
  • Ignorance 22
  • The Baselessness of Our Ideas 23
  • Savages and Conservatives 25
  • Mind and Motion 26
  • Philosophy and Pessimism 27
  • Seekers After Truth 31
  • Pantheism and Agnosticism 34
  • Change 34
  • Dreams and Responsibility 35
  • Appearance and Reality 36
  • III Honest Doubt 39
  • The Sceptic 41
  • Laws 42
  • From Plea in Defense of Loeb and Leopold 42
  • A Summer Night 52
  • From--The Myth of the Sou 55
  • Sea-Shell Murmurs 57
  • Hope 58
  • Clover 60
  • Generation 61
  • IV Gods and Demigods 63
  • The Blow 65
  • The Carpenter's Son 66
  • Creation 67
  • The Problem of Good and Evil 68
  • God and the Devil 70
  • Hertha 71
  • Dead Gods 79
  • Aquæ Sulis 81
  • Αγνώστω + ̨ Θεῷ 82
  • Birth, Love, Death 83
  • Dei Veri Nostri 84
  • Siva, Destroyer 85
  • Lucifer's Farewell 86
  • V The Wise of Old 87
  • Job Speaks 89
  • Body and Soul 90
  • The Rival Philosophies 91
  • Seeking Philosophical Authority 92
  • From--The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam 93
  • Meditations of a Hindoo Prince 96
  • The Smile of All-Wisdom 99
  • From--Prometheus Unbound 100
  • From--The Apologia of Socrates 104
  • VI Priestcraft and Piety 105
  • Priestly Magic and Human Benefit 107
  • A Little Boy Lost 108
  • Religious Dogma and Government 109
  • In Harmony With Nature 110
  • Credulity 111
  • Prayer and Weather 112
  • Providence and Causation 113
  • The Truth 113
  • From--The Storms of Time 114
  • The Impercipient 115
  • The Garden of Love 116
  • Holy Willie's Prayer 117
  • Epitaph on Holy Willie 120
  • The Little Vagabond 121
  • From--The Altar of Righteousness 122
  • The Material Universe Not All 124
  • From--Mistakes of Moses 125
  • The Human Abstract 128
  • Contrite Sinners 129
  • Address to the Unco Guid, or the Rigidly Righteous 130
  • Our Father Man 132
  • From--The Revolt of Islam 133
  • VII Creeds and Dogma 137
  • The Ancient Antagonism 139
  • The Real Conflicts 140
  • Religion and Politics 141
  • Religion and Natural Knowledge 142
  • Sensationalism and Tradition 143
  • Christianity and Buddhism 144
  • Reverence and Reason 145
  • Religion and Music 146
  • Religion as Natural 147
  • To Religion From Theology 148
  • Science and "Sin" 149
  • VIII Mores and Morals 151
  • Dogma, Religion, and Science 153
  • Chance Dogmas and Reasoned Truth 154
  • Matter Means Conditions 155
  • Confused Morality 156
  • Conscience 157
  • Conscience and the Race 159
  • Morality as Art -- And Reformers 160
  • Morality and Intelligence 162
  • Intellectual Integrity 163
  • Morals and Inquiry 164
  • Morality and Astrophysics 165
  • IX Men and Women 167
  • Evolution of Sex 169
  • Humanizing Marriage 170
  • Sex and Taboo 171
  • Sex and Sin 173
  • Quenching the Unquenchable 174
  • The Gospel of Love 175
  • X Our Humbler Brethren 177
  • Heaven 179
  • Only an Insect 180
  • Similar Cases 183
  • The Menagerie 187
  • The Fly 191
  • (A Hindoo Fable) 192
  • A Conservative 194
  • The Conqueror Worm 196
  • XI Our Father, Time 199
  • The Mystery 201
  • The Bourne 201
  • Mutability 202
  • Euthanasia 203
  • Terminus 204
  • To Age 205
  • Life 206
  • Old Folk and Morality 207
  • XII Death and Love 211
  • Epicurean 213
  • Illic Jacet 213
  • The Card-Dealer 214
  • What Matters It? 216
  • Ignorance of Death 217
  • Experience 218
  • Death and Memories 219
  • Thoughts on the Shape of the Human Body 220
  • No Longer Mourn for Me 221
  • Sonnet 222
  • The Great Misgiving 222
  • A Tribute to Ebon C. Ingersoll 223
  • The Hill 225
  • When I Am Dead, My Dearest 225
  • Fidele 226
  • XIII In Time to Come 227
  • Ulysses 229
  • Darwinism 231
  • From--The Altar of Righteousness 231
  • Poetry, Art, Religion 233
  • Possible Mental Powers 234
  • From--Things and Ideals 234
  • The Real Bible 235
  • Accept Our Universe 235
  • Vistas of the Future 237
  • From--Prometheus Unbound 238
  • From--The Ode to Liberty 241
  • Puritans and Birth-Control 242
  • Liberty 243
  • The Seven Seals 244
  • Ourselves Responsible 245
  • Liberty 245
  • Scientific Inventions Revolutionary 246
  • Cor Cordium 247
  • XIV Beyond This Life 249
  • Proof and Personality 251
  • Evidence Demanded 251
  • A Dead March 252
  • The Preacher Speaks 254
  • Immortality 255
  • The Life We Live in Others 255
  • he Pantheist's Song of Immortality 256
  • The West 257
  • The Stars 259
  • Two Sonnets 260
  • Soul and Body 261
  • Man's Cosmic Importance 262
  • Science and Death 262
  • XV The Sum of Life 265
  • Oh, Why Should the Spirit of Mortal Be Proud? 267
  • The Common Lot 269
  • Why Did I Laugh Tonight? 270
  • Laughter and Death 271
  • King Death 271
  • Falstaff's Song 273
  • Up-Hill 274
  • The Garden of Proserpine 275
  • In Articulo Mortis 278
  • Nature 280
  • Vitae Summa Brevis Spem Nos Vetat Incohare Longam 280
  • The End 281
  • The Tempest 281
  • Authors and Titles 283
  • Titles and Authors 287
  • First Lines 292
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