Haughty Conquerors: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763

By William R. Nester | Go to book overview

8
Consequencesl "Whom See We Now, Their Haughty Conquerors"

They take us for a lump of earth which they break in their hands and give us to the winds to blow away.

-- Pontiac

History is lived forward but written in retrospect. We know the end before we consider the beginning, and we can never wholly recapture what it was like to know the beginning only.

-- C. V. Wedgewood

" Amherst's War" may have been the bloodiest and most destructive Indian war in American history. About 500 British troops died during the war and another 50 captives were tortured to death.1 As for civilians, George Croghan believed that the Indians "killed and captivated not less than two thousand of his Majesty's subjects, and drove some thousands to beggary and the greatest distress . . . and . . . plundered of goods . . . to the amount of not less than one hundred thousand pounds."2 That might have been an exaggeration. The best count found that Indians killed 31 around Fort Pitt, 88 between Lake Erie and Fort Pitt, 34 between Fort Pitt and Bedford, and 48 between Bedford and the Susquehanna, for 170 dead altogether. At least 88 traders in the Ohio valley were killed when the uprising broke out and their goods were stolen. Another 200 or so may have been slaughtered elsewhere along the frontier that year and the next.3 The Indians suffered as well. Gladwin estimated that 80 or 90 warriors had been killed around Detroit. The Indians may have lost around 60 warriors at Bushy Run. But they got off fairly lightly elsewhere, except for the peaceful Conestoga In

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Haughty Conquerors: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Notes xiii
  • 1 - Conquest "Where Are We Now? The French Are All Subdued" 1
  • Notes 31
  • 2 - Conspiracies "Destroy Their Forts and Make Them Rue the Day" 35
  • Notes 66
  • 3 - Attacks "And Drive These Britons Hence Like Frightened Deer" 73
  • Notes 103
  • 4 - Counterattacks "Big with Their Victories" 107
  • Notes 145
  • 5 - Stalemate "Leave These Distant Lakes and Streams to Us" 149
  • Notes 179
  • 6 - Subjection "To Be a Vassal to His Low Commanders" 185
  • Notes 223
  • 7 - Settlements "Nay Think Us Conquered, and Our Country Theirs" 231
  • Notes 269
  • 8 - Consequencesl "Whom See We Now, Their Haughty Conquerors" 279
  • Notes 283
  • Index 285
  • About the Author *
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