6
The Dawning of Enlightenment

Even when laws have been written down,they ought not always remain
unaltered.

Aristotle
Politics


INTRODUCTION

Compared to what had gone before, the second half of the twentieth century was to become, eventually, the glory days for women's rights. These years were not totally filled with glory, however, and some of it, like most glory, proved to be of a tenuous, if not fleeting, nature. It is doubtful that women's struggles, slow in coming as they were, will ever be likened to a thoroughbred's race, for the race has been far from fast and is far from won. And with the present composition of the Supreme Court, one not likely to change dramatically for decades, it is unlikely that complete victory is in sight; in fact, the greater probability for the near future is that penalty flags will be thrown down and extra yards added to the distance to the goal line.

The tide toward greater rights for women did not turn immediately with the step into the second half of the century. Sentiments endorsed by Goesaert did not, unfortunately, vanish like magic when the decade switched from the forties to the fifties. Not until the seventies, just a handful of years short of the nation's two hundredth birthday and just two decades short of the two hundredth birthday of the Bill of Rights, did enlightenment seem to

-80-

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