The Path to Dropping Out: Evidence for Intervention

By Melissa Roderick | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
What Do the School Careers of Dropouts and Graduates Look Like?

This chapter will focus on three questions. To what extent do dropouts and graduates in the Fall River cohort differ in terms of their early school performance? What do trends in the grades, attendance, and incidence of grade retention tell us about the path or paths to dropping out? And, how well could we have predicted a youth's later school outcomes on the basis of a pupil's fourth-grade characteristics?

The educational attainment of youths in the Fall River cohort reflected a continuum of outcomes. Some students in this cohort dropped out as early as the seventh grade. Others stayed in school until twelfth grade, but still did not graduate. Some graduates would go on to college, while others ended formal education with their high school diploma. Comparing all dropouts to all graduates may mask important differences in these students' school careers, differences that may hold keys to the determinants of school dropout. The Fall River data set does not contain information on post-high school educational participation. We can, however, examine differences in the school performance of graduates by their graduating class rank. In this chapter, I will discuss trends in the school performance of early grade dropouts (seventh-, eighth-, and ninth-grade dropouts); late grade dropouts (tenth-, eleventh-, and twelfth-grade dropouts); the bottom third of the graduating class; and the middle and top thirds of the graduating class.1 These groups differ in terms of both their average characteristics as of the fourth grade and in their school experiences after the fourth grade.

The first section of this chapter compares the grades and attendance of these different groups of youths in the fourth grade. I then trace the school career paths of students by grade of dropout and graduating class

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Path to Dropping Out: Evidence for Intervention
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.