Sex, Abortion, and Unmarried Women

By Paul Sachdev | Go to book overview

8
After Abortion

"It wasn't what I had expected.

As has been noted all the women found their pregnancy unacceptable and eventually decided to seek its termination. It seems obvious that their desire to escape unwanted parenthood transcended the concerns these women had regarding the medical and psychological risks of the surgical procedure. One thing is clear, that the extraordinary trouble women go through to achieve abortion shows that they must reach a critical point of internal and external stresses.

But what happens after the pregnancy is terminated? Is their actual experience with the surgery different from what they feared? How does the abortion affect the women psychologically? How do they process and reconcile with the experience? How does abortion affect the women's sexual and contraceptive behavior?


EXPERIENCE WITH THE SURGICAL PROCEDURE

Nearly two-thirds (64.3 percent) of the women said that they were amazed that the surgery was very simple and was not nearly so frightful as they had thought. The relatively painless procedure, performed in a short time, was by far the biggest surprise for these women. Illustrative of their reactions are the following excerpts:

-187-

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Sex, Abortion, and Unmarried Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Abortion in Perspective 1
  • 2 - The Abortion Experience 35
  • 3 - The Sample Women and How They Were Studied 51
  • 4 - The Women and Their Sexual and Contraceptive Dossiers 83
  • 5 - Facing the Pregnancy 129
  • 6 - Choosing Abortion 157
  • 7 - A Day in the Hospital: The Final Act 171
  • 8 - After Abortion 187
  • 9 Epilogue 217
  • Appendix A 239
  • Appendix B 267
  • Appendix C 273
  • References 277
  • Index 317
  • About the Author 322
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