The U.S. Constitution and the Power to Go to War: Historical and Current Perspectives

By Gary M. Stern; Morton H. Halperin | Go to book overview
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Appendix

CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS
1. Barry Carter, Georgetown University Law Center
2. Blair Clark, Advisory Board, Center for National Security Studies
3. Ellen Collier, Congressional Research Service
4. Gregory Craig, Williams & Connolly Lori Damrosch, Columbia Law School
5. Norman Dorsen, New York University School of Law
6. Stephen Dycus, Vermont Law School John Hart Ely, Stanford Law School
7. Louis Fisher, Congressional Research Service
8. Michael Glennon, University of California at Davis Law School
9. Charles Gustafson, Georgetown University Law Center
10. Jeremiah Gutman, Levy, Gutman, Goldberg & Kaplan Morton H. Halperin, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
11. Harold Koh, Yale Law School
12. Lance Lindblom, J. Roderick MacArthur Foundation
13. Jules Lobel, University of Pittsburgh Law School Mark Lynch, Covington and Burling
14. David MacMichael, Association of National Security Alumni
15. Kate Martin, Center for National Security Studies
16. John Norton Moore, Univ. of Virginia Law School
17. John Prados, author Presidents' Secret Wars ( 1986)
18. Christopher H. Pyle, Mount Holyoke College
19. Peter Raven-Hansen, George Washington University National Law Center
20. W. Taylor Reveley III, author War Powers of the President and Congress ( 1981)
21. Steve Rickard, Senate Foreign Relations Committee
22. Eugene Rostow, National Defense University
23. Nicholas Rostow, National Security Council (Bush Administration)
24. David Scheffer, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
25. J. Gregory Sidak, American Enterprise Institute

-179-

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