The U.S. Constitution and the Power to Go to War: Historical and Current Perspectives

By Gary M. Stern; Morton H. Halperin | Go to book overview

Appendix

CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS
1. Barry Carter, Georgetown University Law Center
2. Blair Clark, Advisory Board, Center for National Security Studies
3. Ellen Collier, Congressional Research Service
4. Gregory Craig, Williams & Connolly Lori Damrosch, Columbia Law School
5. Norman Dorsen, New York University School of Law
6. Stephen Dycus, Vermont Law School John Hart Ely, Stanford Law School
7. Louis Fisher, Congressional Research Service
8. Michael Glennon, University of California at Davis Law School
9. Charles Gustafson, Georgetown University Law Center
10. Jeremiah Gutman, Levy, Gutman, Goldberg & Kaplan Morton H. Halperin, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
11. Harold Koh, Yale Law School
12. Lance Lindblom, J. Roderick MacArthur Foundation
13. Jules Lobel, University of Pittsburgh Law School Mark Lynch, Covington and Burling
14. David MacMichael, Association of National Security Alumni
15. Kate Martin, Center for National Security Studies
16. John Norton Moore, Univ. of Virginia Law School
17. John Prados, author Presidents' Secret Wars ( 1986)
18. Christopher H. Pyle, Mount Holyoke College
19. Peter Raven-Hansen, George Washington University National Law Center
20. W. Taylor Reveley III, author War Powers of the President and Congress ( 1981)
21. Steve Rickard, Senate Foreign Relations Committee
22. Eugene Rostow, National Defense University
23. Nicholas Rostow, National Security Council (Bush Administration)
24. David Scheffer, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
25. J. Gregory Sidak, American Enterprise Institute

-179-

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The U.S. Constitution and the Power to Go to War: Historical and Current Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 8
  • 1: Historical Survey of the War Powers and the Use of Force 11
  • Notes 26
  • 2: Constitutional Constraints: The War Clause 29
  • Notes 46
  • 3: Statutory Constraints: The War Powers Resolution 55
  • 4: Treaty Constraints: The United Nations Charter and War Powers 83
  • Notes 98
  • 5: International Law Constraints 107
  • Notes 118
  • 6: Judicial Constraints: The Courts and War Powers 121
  • Notes 128
  • 7: Constraints on "Covert" Paramilitary Action 133
  • Notes 147
  • 8: "Covert" Paramilitary Action and War Powers 149
  • Notes 157
  • 9: Emergency War Powers 159
  • Notes 166
  • 10: Common Ground 167
  • Notes 176
  • Appendix 179
  • Selected Bibliography 181
  • Index 191
  • About the Editors and Contributors 197
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