Corporate Misconduct: The Legal, Societal, and Management Issues

By Margaret P. Spencer; Ronald R. Sims | Go to book overview

organization relationship including employee screening and selection, new employee orientation and training, rewards for ethical conduct, and creating and maintaining ethical working conditions.

On the strength of the careful assessment provided above one can see that the payoffs for an HRM strategy that is ethically responsive to all of the organization's stakeholders can be substantial. An HRM strategy that holds contemplated organizational policy decisions in abeyance until the reasonably foreseeable outcomes among all constituents is carefully considered may protect the firm from exposure to significant legal, economic, and social costs. Perhaps the most salient feature of an HRM strategy that is ethically balanced is that it may provide an important competitive advantage to the organization in recruiting and retaining its most vital resource -- labor.


NOTES
1.
T. E. Deal and A. A. Kennedy, Corporate Cultures ( Reading, Mass: Addison- Wesley, 1992), p. 14.
2.
R. S. Schuler, "Strategic Human Resource Management: Linking People with the Strategic Needs of the Business," Organizational Dynamics 21 (Summer 1992), pp. 18-32.
3.
R. R. Sims, "The Institutionalization of Organizational Ethics," Journal of Business Ethics 10 ( July 1991): 493-506.
4.
L. K. Trevino, and S. A. Youngblood, "Bad Apples in Bad Barrels: A Causal Analysis of Ethical Decision-Making Behavior," Journal of Applied Psychology 75 ( August 1990): 378-385.
5.
A. Weiss, "The Value System," Personnel Administrator 34 ( July 1989): 40-41.
6.
E. Jansen and M. A. Von Glinow, "Ethical Ambivalence and Organizational Reward Systems," Academy of management Review 10 ( October 1985): 814-822.
7.
S. Keff, "On the Folly of Rewarding A While Hoping for B," Academy of Management Journal 18 ( December 1975): 769-783.
8.
Jansen and Von Glinow, "Ethical Ambivalence," p. 820.
9.
American Society for Training and Development, Models for HRD Practice ( Alexandria, Va.: ASTD Press, 1988), p. 45.
10.
R. F. Settle and B. A. Burton, "Occupational Safety and Health and the Public Interest," in Public Interest Law, ed. B. Weisbord, J. F. Handler, and N. K. Komesar ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1978), p. 36.
11.
W. W. Lowrance, Of Acceptable Risk (Los Altos, Calif.: William Kaufmann, Inc., 1976), p. 147.
12.
J. Greenberg and Baron R. A., Behavior in Organizations (Needham Heights, Mass.: Allyn & Bacon, 1993), p. 420.
13.
Ibid.
14.
H. Maurer, Not Working ( New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1979), p. 20.

-207-

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Corporate Misconduct: The Legal, Societal, and Management Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Understanding Corporate Misconduct: an Overview and Discussion 1
  • Notes 20
  • 2 - A Look at Corporate Crime 23
  • Notes 38
  • 3 - Corporate Criminal Liability 41
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Corporate Sentencing Guidelines 57
  • Notes 69
  • 5 - The Regulator's Perspective on Corporate Fraud 71
  • Notes 93
  • 6 - Corporate Fraud and the Investor 95
  • Notes 107
  • 7 - Corporate Fraud: the Employee's Perspective 109
  • Notes 122
  • 8 - Hacking, Computer Viruses, and Software Piracy: the Implications of Modern Computer Fraud for Corporations 125
  • Notes 146
  • 9 - Corporate Fraud in Marketing: Business Practices and Advertising Content 149
  • Notes 161
  • 10 - Corporate Codes of Conduct 165
  • Notes 179
  • 11 - Countering Corporate Misconduct: the Role of Human Resource Management 183
  • Notes 207
  • Index 209
  • About the Contributors 213
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