The Liberty Lobby and the American Right: Race, Conspiracy, and Culture

By Frank P. Mintz | Go to book overview

The Liberty Lobby and the American Right
Race, Conspiracy, and Culture

Frank P. Mintz

CONTRIBUTIONS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE, NUMBER 121

GREENWOOD PRESS

WESTPORT, CONNECTICUT

LONDON, ENGLAND

-iii-

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The Liberty Lobby and the American Right: Race, Conspiracy, and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science Series Editor: Bernard K. Johnpoll ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1- The Legacy of the Interwar Period 11
  • 2- Postwar Precursors 47
  • 3- A Network Emerges . . . 65
  • 4- . . . and Grows 85
  • 5- Anti-Zionism and Holocaust Revisionism 107
  • 6- The Struggle Against Respectability 127
  • 7- The Lobby-Birch "Symbiosis" 141
  • 8- The Liberty Lobby Intelligentsia: Professors Oliver and App 163
  • 9- Retrospect and Prospect 197
  • Notes 205
  • Sources 233
  • Index 241
  • About the Author 253
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