Persuasive Encounters: Case Studies in Constructive Confrontation

By Gary C. Woodward | Go to book overview

the ability to offend our expectations about what an advocate for racial freedom would say in the last bastion of state-sponsored segregation. But he predictably confirmed what we expected, giving concrete expression to contradictions that -- on a purely substantive level -- could have just as easily been stated from the United States. The value of the trip was in its drama, in its ability again to invoke the bitter irony of a black nation ruled by a white minority.

It remains in the next chapter to explore in more depth several psychological and social features common to the kinds of public encounters briefly summarized here. As is evident from these public transactions, instances where advocates face hostile listeners offer useful chances to look into the kind of society we are. They also provide an opportunity to examine the communication processes that quietly occur in these highly visible events. Both of these goals are central to this study.


NOTES
1
John Kenneth Galbraith, A Life in Our Times ( New York: Ballantine, 1982), pp. 30-31.
2
Herbert W. Simons, Persuasion: Understanding, Practice, and Analysis, Second Edition ( New York: Random House, 1986), pp. 121-122.
3
This encounter is reconstructed from several sources, including Ellen Sander, "John and Yoko Ono Lennon: Give Peace a Chance", Saturday Review June 28, 1966, pp. 46-47; and the 1988 documentary film Imagine (Warner Brothers).
4
William F. Buckley, Jr., On the Firing Line: The Public Life of Our Public Figures ( New York: Random House, 1989), p. 15.
5
Brian Clark, Whose Life Is It Anyway? ( New York: Dodd and Mead, 1978).
6
Thorstein Veblen's concept of "trained incapacity" is discussed by Kenneth Burke in Permanence and Change: An Anatomy of Purpose, Second Edition ( Indianapolis: BobbsMerrill, 1965), pp. 7-9.
7
Clark, Whose Life Is It Anyway? p. 28.
10
Richard Eder, "Stage: 'Whose Life Is It Anyway?' From Britain", New York Times, April 18, 1979, p. III, p. 15.
11
Jack Newfield, Robert Kennedy: A Memoir ( New York: E. P. Dutton, 1969), p. 19.
12
William V. Shannon, The Heir Apparent: Robert Kennedy and the Struggle for Power ( New York: Macmillan, 1967), p. 54.
13
Kennedy quoted in Newfield, Robert Kennedy, p. 69
14
Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., Robert Kennedy and His Times, Volume II ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1978), p. 809.
15
Harriet J. Rudolph, "Robert F. Kennedy's University of Capetown Address", Central States Speech Journal, Spring 1982, p. 320.
16
Shannon, The Heir Apparent, pp. 136-137.
17
Kennedy quoted in Rudolph, "Robert F. Kennedy's University of Capetown Address", p. 825.
18
Kennedy quoted in Schlesinger, Jr., Robert Kennedy, p. 780,

-23-

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Persuasive Encounters: Case Studies in Constructive Confrontation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Title Page *
  • 1 - The Politics of Confrontation: From John Lennon to Wendell Phillips 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - Persuasive Encounters: A Theoretical Overview 27
  • Notes 49
  • 3 - Edward Kennedy: Behind Enemy Lines 53
  • Notes 75
  • 4 - "This Just Might Do Nobody Any Good": Edward R. Murrow and the News Directors 77
  • Notes 96
  • 5 - The Theater of Conflict: "Donahue" in Russia 99
  • Notes 129
  • 6 - Thomas Szasz and the War against Coercive Psychiatry 133
  • Notes 159
  • 7 - "How Am I Doing?": Gorilla Politics in the Town Meetings of Ed Koch 163
  • Notes 185
  • Selected Bibliography 189
  • Index 193
  • About the Author *
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