Archetypes, Imprecators, and Victims of Fate: Origins and Developments of Satire in Black Drama

By Femi Euba | Go to book overview

Copyright Acknowledgments
The author and publisher are grateful to the following for granting the use of material:
Excerpts from "Rebels and Sambos: The Search for the Negro's Personality in Slavery," by Kenneth M. Stamp, in The Journal of Southern History 37 ( August 1971): 391-392. Copyright 1971 by the Southern Historical Association. Reprinted by permission of the Managing Editor.
Excerpts from "Dream on Monkey Mountain" from Dream on Monkey Mountain and Other Plays by Derek Walcott. Copyright © 1970 by Derek Walcott. Reprinted by permission of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Inc.
Excerpts from Ifa Divination and Sixteen Cowries by William Bascom. Copyright © 1969 and 1980, respectively, by Indiana University Press.
Excerpt from pp. 131-140 of Selected Plays and Prose of Amiri BarakalLeRoi Jones. Copyright © 1979 by Amiri Baraka. Reprinted by permission of William Morrow and Company, Inc.
Excerpts from "Dutchman" and "The Slave" by LeRoi Jones in Two Plays By LeRoi Jones. Reprinted by permission of Sterling Lord Literistic, Inc. Copyright © 1964 by LeRoi Jones.
Excerpts from Black Theater U.S.A. edited by James V. Hatch. Copyright © 1974 by The Free Press, a Division of Macmillan, Inc. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.
Excerpts from The Tragedy of King Christophe by Aime Cesaire. Copyright © Presence Africaine 1963 and 1970. Reprinted by permission of Presence Africaine, and Georges Borchardt, Inc.
Excerpts from "Sizwe Bansi is Dead," in Sizwe Bansi Is Dead and The Island by Athol Fugard, John Kani, and Winston Ntshona, Viking-Penguin, 1976. Reprinted by permission of Theatre Communications Group, Inc.
Excerpts from A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry, 1966. Reprinted by permission of Random House.
Excerpts from Ovonramwen Nogbaisi by Ola Rotimi, 1974. Reprinted by permission of Oxford University Press and Ethiope Publishing Corporation.
Excerpts from A Play of Giants by Wole Soyinka, 1984. Reprinted by permission of Brandt & Brandt and Methuen, Inc.
Excerpts from "A Dance of the Forests," in Collected Plays by Wole Soyinka, 1973. Reprinted by permission of Oxford University Press.
Excerpts from Death and the King's Horseman by Wole Soyinka, 1975. Reprinted by permission of Brandt & Brandt and Methuen, Inc.
Excerpts from Sortilege (Black Mystery) by Abdias do Nascimento, 1978. Reprinted by permission of Third World Press.
Excerpts from Shango de Ima: A Yoruba Mystery Play by Pepe Carril, 1970. Reprinted by permission of Doubleday.
Excerpts from Kinjeketile by E. N. Hussein, 1969. Reprinted by permission of Oxford University Press.
Excerpts from Monsieur Toussaint by Edouard Glissant, 1981. Reprinted by permission of Three Continents Press.
Excerpts from Iyere Ifa: The Deep Chants of Ifa, translated and edited by Robert Armstrong, et al., 1978. Reprinted by permission of University of Ibadan Press.

-v-

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Archetypes, Imprecators, and Victims of Fate: Origins and Developments of Satire in Black Drama
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 12
  • I - ORIGINS 15
  • 1 - Concepts of Fate 17
  • 2 - Archetypes: Satire and Satirist 45
  • II - DEVELOPMENTS 69
  • 3 - Victims of Satire 71
  • 4 - Drama of Epidemic 121
  • Conclusion 163
  • Appendix: List of Informants 165
  • Glossary: Yoruba Tones in Words, Phrases, and Sentences 167
  • Selected Bibliography 173
  • Index 191
  • About the Author 201
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