An Independent Woman: The Life of Lou Henry Hoover

By Anne Beiser Allen; Jon L. Wakelyn | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Stanford University and Herbert Hoove

The lecture, given by Dr. John Casper Branner, professor of geology at Stanford University, was entitled "The Bones of the Earth." Branner was an enthusiastic and inspiring speaker, and Lou, whose interest in earth sciences dated back to her hikes through the mountains with her father and that exciting summer when she helped him operate the mine in Acton, was hooked. She decided to enroll at Stanford to study geology under Dr. Branner.

Leland Stanford Junior University was only three years old. It had been founded in 1891 by California Senator and rail baron Leland Stanford in memory of his son, Leland Jr., who had died of typhoid seven years before at the age of fifteen. Located on the 8,800-acre Stanford ranch, the university was thirty miles from San Francisco and seventy-five from Monterey. Its buff sandstone buildings had been designed by architect Frederick Olmsted, who also designed New Yorles Central Park. They were arranged in an open quadrangle, joined by long sandstone arcades with red tile roofs. Grain fields surrounded the campus, punctuated here and there by an occasional live oak or eucalyptus tree. Several horse farms were nearby; Stanford himself raised racehorses. On the northeast corner of the ranch stood a single sequoia -- the tall tree (or palo alto) that gave the community growing up around the campus its name. Tuition at Stanford was free, and from the first the school was fully coeducational.

When Lou started classes at Stanford in the fall of 1894, many buildings were still under construction, and new departments were being added each year. Ellen Coit Elliott, wife of the school's registrar, complained that the campus looked "exactly like a factory."1 Roble Hall, the women's dormitory, had been built rather

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Independent Woman: The Life of Lou Henry Hoover
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 211

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.