AIDS Prevention and Services: Community Based Research

By Johannes P. Van Vugt | Go to book overview

responses that were expected--particularly since few had to do with sexual behavior per se. Similarly, reviewing educational assessment forms that were completed by GMHC's trainers in advance of each training for mental health providers gave us valuable program planning information about how the needs of that target audience had changed over time.


A CONCLUDING NOTE

The purpose of this chapter has been to outline a process for developing new HIV education programs that has evolved from the successes, failures, frustrations, and educated guesses of a corps of dedicated staff and volunteers in the education department of Gay Men's Health Crisis. When any of us talk about this program model, we are usually asked whether so much process is necessary and whether there are shortcuts that can conserve time and money. We usually tell them there are shortcuts and we use them. But we also try to say that the investment in time and money in the process of planning usually saves time and money in the long run because it saves us from many--albeit not all--mistakes. Those mistakes usually happen because we make an assumption where we should have asked a question. Often those assumptions grow out of the belief that a gay male HIV educator is representative of the entire gay male population or that a Latino educator holds the same beliefs as the Latino population in a particular neighborhood. At this point in the epidemic, that is not always the case.

All of us function in a variety of cultural groups. Some play a major key in our lives, and others are minor harmonies. Every person in need of education is entitled to find that part of the broader melody where he or she feels most comfortable and to encounter there the information that makes sense for the moment and the opportunity to address a broader agenda when the time is right. It must be for us as educators a matter of trust in the communities we serve that, over time, most people will care enough about their own health and well-being to seek out the information they need to stay healthy and to seek for that information in places that are hospitable to them. The experience of Gay Men's Health Crisis demonstrates that when community based organizations understand themselves to be accountable to the communities they serve and commit themselves to be a part of those communities, our trust is well placed.


NOTES
1.
Fordice J. "Disproportionate Change in Sexual Behavior Among Minority Gay and Bisexual Men in New York City: 1981-1986", Fourth International Conference on AIDS, Stockholm, 1988.
2.
While this chapter addresses only the education and prevention programs of Gay Men's Health Crisis, it should be noted that GMHC is a comprehensive AIDS

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
AIDS Prevention and Services: Community Based Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 285

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.